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Starting to do some research.

Discussion in 'Raw Food Diets' started by Derek1, May 23, 2017.

  1. TWadeJ

    TWadeJ Big Dog

    It is enjoyable to watch your dog chow down on a healthy raw meal.
     
  2. Derek1

    Derek1 Big Dog

    were do you feed them. Does it make a mess.
     
  3. Derek1

    Derek1 Big Dog

    I'm gonna stop bothering you for the night lol. Thanks again for all your help. I'm sure I'll have more ?'s the more I read.
     
  4. TWadeJ

    TWadeJ Big Dog

    Very messy. In their crates.
     
  5. Derek1

    Derek1 Big Dog

    This may be a stupid ? But if choking is a problem for dogs making the transition can't I chop it up into bite size pieces.
     
  6. TWadeJ

    TWadeJ Big Dog

    I don't know why you couldn't. I don't think choking would be an issue with a chicken quarter or a turkey neck. It is the smaller bones which may cause issues in gulpers I have read.
     
  7. Nat Ursula

    Nat Ursula Good Dog

    Be
    careful, I fed Tonka 1 1/4 lb daily without including a supplement and I think I weakened her body. We were walking quite a bit at the time. Plus she was playing with another dog for a few hours every week.
     
  8. Nat Ursula

    Nat Ursula Good Dog

    That is why I used Bravo Blends. However, now there is a warning on the container that says that just the chubs alone is not adequate nutrition for the dog.
     
  9. Derek1

    Derek1 Big Dog

    @Nat Ursula
    That's kind of how I feel, like it's not enough but I don't know enough to really have a opinion. I suppose that's what is important about making sure it balances out over the week.
     
    Nat Ursula likes this.
  10. TWadeJ

    TWadeJ Big Dog

    One of the benefits of feeding raw meaty bones is that it keeps their teeth clean avoiding the cost and anesthesia involved in teeth cleaning.
     
    pitbulldogs and Nat Ursula like this.
  11. Nat Ursula

    Nat Ursula Good Dog

    image.jpg image.jpg These posters are helpful.
     
    TWadeJ likes this.
  12. TWadeJ

    TWadeJ Big Dog

    Great charts Nat.
     
    Nat Ursula likes this.
  13. Derek1

    Derek1 Big Dog

    Thanks nat
     
    Nat Ursula likes this.
  14. Noah George

    Noah George Little Dog

    I fed my ol' girl raw for a time – the only reason I didn't continue was that it was too inconvenient for the situation at the time, and I wasn't able to find the right sources to make it economical enough, either.

    To be honest, especially if you have a gulper and are only feeding around a pound a day total, I would just go with feeding once a day. The dog will be more satisfied, you can feed larger pieces, and I imagine it opens up more food options for you, as well. A pound of food is more than you would think going into things, haha, that was what I was feeding my girl and it was still a decent portion of food. A chicken from the grocery store typically weighs 3-5lbs depending on whether you get a fryer or a roaster, for example.

    Also, as Wade said, just like feeding kibble you start at an amount and adjust as needed depending on how the dog looks. Balance in raw happens over time, like with our own diets (well, they should be balanced over time). So long as the overall diet is 80% meat, 10% edible bone, and 10% organs (5% liver, 5% others – “if it doesn't secrete, feed it as meat”) then you should be good. Variety is key, with both meat sources and types of organs. As you've seen, you can offer other items such as fish oil, eggs, some people offer vegetables and/or fruits (though these should be limited in a prey-model raw diet).

    I never really got any major hauls when I did raw, but typically when I did bring it home I would portion it out and bag up individual servings before freezing. But that was largely because if I didn't do it that way, I tended not to do it until I really needed to...you figure out what kind of works for you and your situation and that may change as you get more used to things. You're right about it getting easier and becoming more routine as you do it: it's really one of those things that's more daunting than it needs to be. Once you have a solid knowledge base, you figure it out pretty quickly. At least, that's been my experience.

    A lot of people are like Wade and feed in the dogs' crates. Some also teach them to eat on a towel or something that can be picked up and washed, and some people just feed on an easily cleaned flooring. For example, I fed in the kitchen and then just steam cleaned the floor afterward. I didn't find it really all that messy, but perhaps that's a “mileage may vary” sort of thing – I thought muddy dog feet were considerably messier than feeding raw.

    Choking is usually only a problem for gulpers, in which case the traditional advice is to actually feed larger pieces that they have to chew. Feeding frozen raw food can help, as well. Sometimes dogs gulp at first because of novelty and, I imagine, probably some idea that they need to hurry up and eat it before we realize what we gave them and take it back – that's how it seems at least. Some gulpers sort of resolve themselves as they get used to the diet. I have heard of others, though, who continue to gulp once they get the food smaller, but not necessarily small enough. That tends to be a smaller number of dogs and sometimes people do have to resort to grinds as the primary diet for those dogs.

    You can often keep the cost down, and get a good variety of organs, by sourcing out butchers and game processors willing to give you useable organs and cuttings – just explain that it's to feed to the dog and they would probably be willing to give you a decent price. Tell people you know that if they hit a deer to get a tag for it so you can process it for dog food. Remember though, if you're feeding wild game and certain types of fish, you should freeze the meat and organs for a certain amount of time (I think at least a month, but may depend upon how deep the freeze is): this will take care of most parasites. When processing, you or the processor can also give the organs a thorough look-over for parasites, as well. People will warn about Trichinosis/Trichinella in pork, but if you're feeding human-grade pork it's not a concern in the US; it is, however, one of the parasite types that can be carried by wild game, particularly bears. Other good sources to keep costs down are Craigslist and, if you're fortunate enough to live near enough to one, Asian markets.

    The internet is a great source of information, but I personally found it more useful for a general idea, of sorts, and to answer questions. The best sources to educate yourself in preparation for feeding a raw food diet is reading books. They're in-depth and comprehensive, and you can always refer to them. One great book is Give Your Dog a Bone by Dr. Ian Billinghurst. There's others, but that's the one I can think of off the top of my head and the one I found the most helpful. I can try and dig up the others, if you'd like, and there's probably more that I haven't read (yet).
     
    Nat Ursula likes this.
  15. Derek1

    Derek1 Big Dog

    Thanks for talking the time to right all that Noah. Do you know of a chart that explains bone to meat ratios in certain cuts of meat or do I not need to be that specific.
     
    Nat Ursula likes this.
  16. TWadeJ

    TWadeJ Big Dog

  17. TWadeJ

    TWadeJ Big Dog

  18. Noah George

    Noah George Little Dog

    No problem, Derek.

    Haha, Wade beat me to it, it looks like, and probably delivered better than I would have: I was sure there were some, but it's been a while since I've seriously looked into raw feeding, so I would have had to do some digging.

    You don't have to worry too much about exact percentages, really. The bone and meat ratios are somewhat more guidelines as some dogs need more or less bone (determined by their stool). Charts can help to give you an idea, as can getting familiar with the anatomy and the cuts that you're dealing with; quartering your own chickens, at the least, can help to give you a good idea of how much meat there is to bone in an animal. Another tactic some people use is to sort of imagine that you're "building" an animal with the meals you're feeding, which can help with the "balance over time." All of that said, if you're keeping track of his stool, that's a good way to tell whether or not you're feeding the right amount of bone.
     
    Nat Ursula likes this.
  19. Derek1

    Derek1 Big Dog

    I'm going for it. I got a freezer in the works. I'm gonna keep reading up and start working on sources for meat. Once I get a month or two ahead of the game I'll make the switch.
     
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  20. TWadeJ

    TWadeJ Big Dog

    Where do you live? Google "raw dog food co-op (your city)". Many cities have raw co-ops which buy in bulk and split between members. It both lowers the price and increases availability of different foods. I get green tripe from a co-op.

    Good luck!
     
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