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Raising a puppy & working full time (8hour shifts maximum)

Discussion in 'Pit Bull Puppy Discussions' started by SelinaKyle, Nov 8, 2017.

  1. ETRaven2

    ETRaven2 Little Dog

    I just lost a whole freaking post I edited to LeighAnn, so add this to my little convo above.
    exceptions, but I like the fact that bully breeds aren't known to be dog-social. So to me, telling someone this, is not trying to discourage adoption or otherwise. It is just meant to honestly inform of what the breed they are getting into may present with later in life.
    As for hurting the masses, I believe, and this may sound cruel, that sometimes a dog is better off humanely euth'd than placed with an owner who wants the dog to be something other than it is. I too have worked rescue, HSUS and a few private orgs that foster only. I've always been honest with a potential adopter about the high DA propensity in bull breeds. If that turns them away, I see it as a good thing, because I would never want to adopt a dog out that wasn't the right fit for the adopter. I understand that you think I may have had an adopter pass up a dog that would never be DA because I mentioned they could be. I wrestle with that myself sometimes, however, I rather err on the side of caution than get a call that Bruiser mauled Fluffy to death and the kids are heartbroken. That's why I like foster-with-potential-to adopt so much.
     
    LeighAnn likes this.
  2. Michele

    Michele Chi Super Dog Staff Member Super Moderator

    Of course Bully's can socialize. I just don't think a doggie day care is the place to do it. By you giving a "fair chance", believe it or not, you are setting the dog up to fail. And honestly, most of the people that work at these doggie day cares don't know a thing about their genetic make-up.
     
    AGK likes this.
  3. LeighAnn

    LeighAnn Little Dog Premium Member

    I personally never have used a doggie day care so I cannot say that with confidence about the staff and their training.. I just have several friends that use one in particular here in the Birmingham area.. They require small groups of the same dogs on a daily basis and have limited availability.. So the dogs socialize with the same small group of dogs each day. The dog must also pass the temperament test prior to acceptance. They have nap time from 11 to 1pm and are on a pretty tight schedule. but according to the images, the website and feedback from other individuals I know.. they do allow bully breeds in the facility if they pass the temperment test and they also evaluate and put them in a select group of dogs that they pair with best.. so this is their assigned group for the duration of their keeping..

    So in regards to 'failing' the dog.. I am not sure if I understood correctly on this.. When you have a moment could you explain further? What I am gathering is that putting a bully breed in a social setting will set the dog up for poor behavior? Just want to make sure I understand prior to responding on this point. Thanks!
     
  4. Michele

    Michele Chi Super Dog Staff Member Super Moderator

    What I mean by "setting the dog up to fail" is this.....you are putting a bully breed in a situation to mingle among all these other dogs, (not really knowing how these other dogs interact) knowing full well the breed most likely is DA, and hoping for the best. A fight can happen in the blink of an eye and when that happens, that's where you just set up your dog to fail.
     
  5. Michele

    Michele Chi Super Dog Staff Member Super Moderator

    ETRaven2 likes this.
  6. LeighAnn

    LeighAnn Little Dog Premium Member

    Oh no.. so aggravating.. All really great points here.. I feel that there are two types of bully breed owners who ruin the breed.. One that likes the dog for it's known aggression, who encourages the aggression and promotes this.. and then one day, the dog may get out or the wrong dog or person might come across this dog and it attacks . Bad rap for the breed for sure..

    Then there is the other bully breed owner who has no knowledge of being a dog owner, they've never owned a dog and are very careless with discipline, exercise and lack the ability to be a firm and assertive leader to the animal.. This animal becomes out of control, unruly, and doesn't listen to the owner. it gets out of control and attacks a person or dog.. It too gives the dog a bad rap.

    I do feel that Bully Breeds should be more for the experienced dog handler or someone who knows how to correct bad behaviour and read dog body language.. so I agree that they all prospect adopters should realize what stigma this breed does have and how important it is to stay on top of them with leadership.
     
    ETRaven2 likes this.
  7. LeighAnn

    LeighAnn Little Dog Premium Member

    Oh yes.. that is what I thought you were speaking of.. So true.. and you are right.. Dog parks I am more weary of.. These are random dogs, different dogs all the time. They do not need to pass a temperment test or be paired with a group best suited for the dog .. So.. Dog parks and setting up to fail is more of something I am agreeing with you on for sure.. and in regards to Huey wondering about Day Care.. I would tell her that each business is different.. I would trust my dogs at the one in birmingham.. but not any other dog facility but that one due to the strict guidelines of acceptance.
     
  8. Michele

    Michele Chi Super Dog Staff Member Super Moderator

    Just so you know, you cannot fix a genetic trait. You can only manage it.
     
    LeighAnn and ETRaven2 like this.
  9. ETRaven2

    ETRaven2 Little Dog

    I've noticed too, in all the time that I've owned mastiff-type breeds, (dobes, rotts, BBMs) that they wont initiate a fight, but they certainly will engage and finish a fight once provoked. In day care situations, a lot of the dogs are rude. IME bull breeds don't tolerate rude well.
     
    LeighAnn likes this.
  10. Michele

    Michele Chi Super Dog Staff Member Super Moderator

    You can have the strictest guidelines, it doesn't matter if that dog is DA. A dog can pass a temperment test, but if that dog is DA, it won't matter.
     
  11. Michele

    Michele Chi Super Dog Staff Member Super Moderator

    OP: read all the posts in this thread carefully. If possible try to come home during your lunch or try to have someone, familar with this breed, come to walk the dog during the day.
     
    ETRaven2 likes this.
  12. ETRaven2

    ETRaven2 Little Dog

    I have a lot of experience with doggy day care. 9/10 have temperament testing and group dogs according to their size and rambunctiousness. It's fairly commonplace.
     
  13. ETRaven2

    ETRaven2 Little Dog

    Oh no.. so aggravating.. All really great points here.. I feel that there are two types of bully breed owners who ruin the breed.. One that likes the dog for it's known aggression, who encourages the aggression and promotes this.. and then one day, the dog may get out or the wrong dog or person might come across this dog and it attacks . Bad rap for the breed for sure..

    Are you talking HA or DA?
     
  14. Worg

    Worg Little Dog

    I agree with what Novy said. If a friend or family cannot let your pup out, then hire someone. I was this person for my brother who decided to get a puppy working full time. The biggest struggle was water bowls being tipped over and soaking the inside of the cage, I would suggest buying a bowl that attaches to the crate itself.

    When crating a pup all day they will ideally be sleeping most of that time, which means when you get home to the time you go to bed the pup will probably be pretty rowdy and need to let out some energy. If you don't help tire the pup out, you won't be getting much sleep that night.
     
  15. Worg

    Worg Little Dog

    The only way I see boarding as an option is if the dogs were not involved in group play, I don't understand why boarding kennels do this with the risks involved. Even if your dog is not DA, others could potentially be, fights happen, and any dog could get hurt. Boarding kennel staff really aren't taught or experienced in breaking up REAL fights either, they can only interrupt scuffles, you get a gripping breed involved and it's game over because they don't have parting sticks or the know how to separate.
    But like Raven said, kenneling is extremely stressful, this is still not ideal. I only see a boarding kennel as an option if they aren't going to put my dog with other dogs and it's an absolute emergency and I cannot take my dog with me if I go somewhere. Even then, these businesses aren't always trustworthy. I met a BBM owner who uses a boarding kennel for day care and they, without telling her, use her dog as a TEST DOG to see if newcomers are dog friendly, because this dog is scared of everything and doesn't pick fights. Which is a bad idea for many reasons, including the fact that timid submissive dogs often get targeted by other dogs. She took it as a compliment to her dog, I took it as a huge risk to her dog, I would be furious if it were mine.

    I recently posted about a dog called Fawna in a local rescue, this was the situation with her, they didn't know she was DA until she got into a home. I've heard it many other times, but this is a dog who is was returned because of it and is currently living the kennel life because people don't accept that it's a likely trait in these dogs.
     
    ETRaven2 likes this.
  16. ETRaven2

    ETRaven2 Little Dog

    Are you kidding me? Wow. I would be furious too.
     
  17. pitbulldogs

    pitbulldogs GR CH ACE Staff Member Administrator Premium Member

    Crating is your best option hands down. Then find someone that you can trust and that will listen when you educate them about the breed they are going to handle and possibly care for so they can do it responsibly. Outside of that, enjoy the pup and keep us updated on him! Cute pup btw.
     
    ETRaven2 likes this.
  18. SelinaKyle

    SelinaKyle Puppy

    Thank you everyone! I will just go ahead with the crating and play pen and puppy pads and see about hiring someone to take him out in the middle of the day.
     
    Michele likes this.
  19. Michele

    Michele Chi Super Dog Staff Member Super Moderator

    keep us updated!!
     
  20. AGK

    AGK Scratch Kingz Staff Member Super Moderator

    I work 50+ hours a week at a job, have a family that includes a 5 year old and a 12 year old that is heavily involved in scholastic sports and have ran a yard of dogs since 96. I have litter 2 to 3 times a year so theres always a pup or 2 or 10 around here. Never had much of a problem with housebreaking a dog. Even my chain dogs are housebroken since they all spend their first year of life in my home. It takes major commitment on your part to raise one of these dogs properly including training. If I can do it with 8+ dogs and 3 litters a year with my lifestyle and daily schedule I'm sure it can be done with 1 single dog without strenuating effort. Just takes commitment and dedication on your part. Once a pup reaches 5 or 6 months of age it should be able to hold its bladder for the time your at work.
     

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