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Purchase or adopt?

Discussion in 'Dog Debates' started by Valco, Sep 17, 2014.

  1. Valco

    Valco Puppy

    So I am all for adopting a dog from a shelter before buying from a breeder, HOWEVER, I also don't see anything wrong with purchasing from a breeder either.

    I was out with a friend who was taking her lab to go swimming in a public pool, a couple walks up to greet us (and the 10 months of cuteness puppy) and asks about where she was adopted from. As soon as the woman heard "from a breeder" she snorted and backed away, then attempted to try and lecture us about "all the dogs dying everyday in shelters that need homes." Her husband stopped her and steered her away, so we didn't really have a chance to respond.

    So I was just wondering what other people thought; purchase through a breeder or go to a shelter/rescue and adopt?

    (For those that know about Valco, I am not asking for my own purpose, I was just interested in opinions) :)
     
  2. Beret

    Beret Bullyflop

    Personal preference :)

    Just depends on what you're looking for out of a dog
     
  3. BCdogs

    BCdogs Good Dog Staff Member Super Moderator

    It depends on what you plan on doing with your dog. If you want to show, go to a breeder. If you want more of a guarantee on temperament and health, go to a breeder. If you want to understand the history behind your dog, go to a breeder. If none of that matters, adopt a dog. :)

    I see absolutely nothing wrong with ETHICAL breeders, so when I refer to a breeder, that's what I mean.
     
  4. Valco

    Valco Puppy

    And that is exactly how I feel, I think I was more in shock that someone would even try and suggest that a person was bad for purchasing a dog and not going to a shelter and adopting. My friend was pissed, the exact reason that she went through a breeder was so she had some idea of the dogs temperament and health history.
     
  5. BCdogs

    BCdogs Good Dog Staff Member Super Moderator

    I'm not surprised. So many rescues and organizations cramming campaigns to adopt down people's throats. If you decide you want a registered, purebred dog, you're "adding to the problem."

    My next dog will absolutely be from a breeder. I love my mutts and I'm glad I got them first in order to get used to the high-strung, DA tendencies of a purebred bull breed, just watered down. After my current dogs I feel I'll be ready for a purebred APBT. :)
     
  6. NobodyHere

    NobodyHere Guest

    Oh, believe me, you'll hear a lot more of that as you work your way through the "dog world" and I'm honestly surprised that's the first time you had. It's the "us vs. them" AR-esque furmommy mentality in modern society anymore where people are pushed and guilted into "rescuing" lest they be directly responsible for "murder."

    Hell, this pretty much sums up these people in a nut(ter) shell... This is one of my own puppy owners defending herself against this crap a few days ago.

    [​IMG]
     
  7. BCdogs

    BCdogs Good Dog Staff Member Super Moderator

    ^^ Wow, that escalated quickly. I had no idea that breeders were now compared to pedophiles...
     
  8. NobodyHere

    NobodyHere Guest

    All the time. And rapists, and murderers, and the list goes on and on.
     
  9. BCdogs

    BCdogs Good Dog Staff Member Super Moderator

    That is insane.
     
  10. Valco

    Valco Puppy

    Honestly, after what I went through with Valco (and I by no means regret adopting him) I don't believe a lot of the people who rescue dogs from shelters "because it's the PC thing to do" should. Most of the dogs that end up there in the first place have some kind of issue; too hyper, barks too much, got too big, no longer cute because it grew up. Not all have issues, most truly are stable dogs that just need actual WORK and training. And unless you are lucky enough to get them as a puppy, require a bit more work then a dog that you have raised yourself because you have to build that relationship first AND get to know the dog.
     
  11. Beki

    Beki Good Dog Premium Member

    Honestly, my next dog WILL come from a reputable well thought out breeder. Up until this point all of mine have been from rescue or a rescue situation. Some have worked out fabulous, others I have found myself in your shoes. I really don't want to take a chance and flip a coin again.
     
  12. NobodyHere

    NobodyHere Guest

    The unfortunate thing is that in many cases anymore, "rescue" has turned into some sort of ego-driven competition of sorts to see who can "save" or "rehabilitate" the most diseased or damaged dogs, both physically and mentally, that they can find, and so that's a large portion of what people have to choose from anymore if they feel the need to adopt an animal, while dogs who are otherwise perfectly healthy and stable but may need a little "tune up" in the training department here and there to make them ideal for adoption are passed up because they don't have a "story" and don't bring in sympathy and revenue. Sad reality. Obviously not for all rescues, but the number of those types are growing.
     
  13. Valco

    Valco Puppy

    Which makes it hard for people like me, I call myself a novice owner, but only in the respect that I had never adopted an adult dog (who obviously had issues). I grew up with dogs all my life, mostly of the terrier or guardian breed variety, but all had been known from puppies and had come from breeders. I went to the shelter with the idea of adopting an adult dog to give a second home, and I was honestly trying to avoid the puppy stage due to my work hours and long commute. I agree with SS, the rescue community seems to be turning into a very furmommy-cliquish warped version of what it truly should be. I do not believe you can save them all, and some you really shouldn't.

    Maybe next time I will go through a breeder, but adopt one of their retired dogs. :)
     
  14. Beki

    Beki Good Dog Premium Member

    And there are some truly fabulous ones out there! I would be happy to help point you in that direction if I hear of any.
     
  15. Lillie May

    Lillie May Good Dog

    It's up to each person to decide what kind of dog they want. It's possible to get purebred dogs from rescues, not the fur mommies kind, but specific breed only ones. For instance boxers, greyhounds, chows, etc. I've had both experiences, some were pound puppies, others strays, and the AKC Chows through a breeder. Anyone who tells me what I should be doing, is going to get an earful. I really don't know where people get off giving their opinion when it wasn't asked.
     
  16. Jamielvsaustin

    Jamielvsaustin Good Dog


    Pretty much-that's how I feel about it.

    For me, personally, I don't ever see a need to go to a breeder. What I do with my dogs isn't going to be anything that betters the breed (aside from representing them in a positive light). We don't do events that are ranked, we aren't trying to breed, we'll never show our dogs, we don't go hunting...we do normal, everyday, mundane things with our dogs. A shelter/rescue/adopted dog will work just fine for that.
     
  17. Beatrix Kiddo

    Beatrix Kiddo Good Dog

    My next dog will be from a breeder. I've ended up with poorly bred dogs with health/temperament issues in the past and my next dog i will be working and doing sports with so he will be purchased from an ethical, reputable breeder. That's my choice based on what i'm looking for in a dog and what i'll be doing with it. If someone was just looking for a loving companion, oh course i would point them in the direction of a shelter. I see absolutely nothing wrong with getting a dog from a breeder though. It's a big decision that you'll live with for the next 10+ years.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 18, 2014
  18. Michele

    Michele Chi Super Dog Staff Member Administrator

    My next one will be from SevenSins or Boogieman:grin:
     
  19. Alliegirl

    Alliegirl Little Dog

    My next dog will likely be from a breeder, much to my husband's chagrin.

    I have no issues with responsible breeders. I have no issues with rescues who rehome animlas. I have issues with the plethora of morons who take two random dogs and stick them together and call themselves breeders. I have issues with puppy mills who breed for profit.
     
  20. Savage Destiny

    Savage Destiny Big Dog

    Even then, health is a big enough reason to go to a good breeder. We dabbled in agility and would have liked to do fun sports stuff, but really couldn't due to Riddle's health. A lot of the time she couldn't/can't even do normal pet stuff like go on hikes or swim. There is nothing in the world more painful than watching a young, enthusiastic, energetic dog limited by their body. It's been heartbreaking. Aside from the money issues- which are big enough- I don't ever want to go through the heartbreak of having another train wreck like Riddle. So all my future dogs are going to come from good, ethical breeders producing healthy dogs.
     

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