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My 2 year old female Pitt Scarlett is all the sudden acting out ?

Hello my names Natasha and my boyfriend Brandon and I rescued a female rednose pitbull from the shelter! Her name is Scarlett. She is roughly two years old according to them. Scarlett's story is vaguely know to us. The owner of the shelter has pitbulls and Scarlett was one of there puppies. She adopted Scarlett out to some one in another town. A few months later she got a call that Scarlett had been found. Why did they call her well the people who had adopted her thankfully never changed her I'd tag with her number on it. So she went and picked up Scarlett and brought her back to our town and kept Scarlett at her shelter. Mean while back at our house we had just moved in together and I really wanted another puppy. I have always had dogs before and after I lost my other one I had decided that it was time for a new one. So my boyfriend came home one day and he had let Scarlett in the house. (Guess he went and asked the shelter if he could trial bring Scarlett home and to surprise me all in one and they agreed) so this one year old pit comes running through my house and I fell in love! She's my everything ever sense. So well behaved yet still very playful and wonderful. Probably had her about eight months. Never had a problem with her chewing things up. Now all the sudden we even leave for an hour she is chewing up the trash and the other day my heals. She's never done this before. She's also all over me constantly. Shoving her head under my hang and in my arm wanting to be petted. She wants to sit beside me but instead of curling up beside me like she used to she tries to sit on me. I play with her and pet her all the time. I spoil her with love an attention all the time but as of late she acts like I never give her attention. This trash thing has me worried its like she's acting out. But I love my baby very much! And am very excited about this site. Any body have any ideas about this?
 
N

NobodyHere

Guest
First off, why aren't you crating when you aren't home and allowing her access to the items she's destroying to begin with? Crate training, or the use of a proper chainspot or kennel setup when the dog can't be supervised, is important for the dog's safety. American Pit (one "t") Bull Terriers are exuberant, mischievous dogs who can be destructive when they're not properly contained, and stimulated. What sort of physical exercise and mental stimulation are you giving to this dog, and how often? Petting or "spoiling" isn't the be-all and end-all.
 

Lillie May

Good Dog
Hi and welcome to the forum. I hope you have thick skin, because most members tell it like it is. That happens to be a really good thing, because you get accurate information from people who know and love the breeds!

It sounds like she's chewing because she's bored. These dogs need a lot of physical and mental stimulation. I'd put the trash can somewhere that she can't get to it. You don't want her eating something that could cause a blockage. Don't leave anything on the floor for her to chew, and I'd crate her for now when you leave until you get it under control.

One of the most endearing things about these dogs is how they think they're little lap dogs! They thrive on affection, but that makes training easier because they really want to please us. I'd recommend a basic obedience class. Do you have pics? We love seeing them. Do you know if she's a pedigreed dog, or a Generic Bull Breed mix?

Read the sticky threads located at the top of each topic section, especially the general dog discussion and the training & behavior. Are you aware they're prone to dog aggression DA and small animal aggression AA? This is normal, you learn to manage it should it come up. Enjoy the forum, feel free to post any questions you'd like help with.
 

Warren

Puppy
On Average, an ABPT when full grown needs to run about 5 kilometers a day, if you convert to mile I think it is just over 3 miles a day.
I know I can't run 5 km a day but I try to take my dogs for a good solid run at least twice a week.
On the other days that I don't run, I let them choose what games they want to play.

One piece of valuable information I can give you, although it is not related to this topic is learn your dog's body language.
Our dogs can understand us but not all dogs owners can understand what their dogs are telling them.
When my little girl (she will be 11 years on 4th April) barks at the gate I first try to see why she is barking.
If I can't see what she is barking at I chase her away from the gate and tell her to stop it.
If she then runs a in a circle around me and goes back to the gate I I know there is something I missed and need to investigate further.
 

_unoriginal

Cow Dog
On Average, an ABPT when full grown needs to run about 5 kilometers a day, if you convert to mile I think it is just over 3 miles a day.

I'm going to have to disagree with this. There's no set amount a dog should need to run daily to get enough exercise. It will vary greatly depending on the specific dog. I don't run my dog at all. We exercise other ways but no structured runs/jogs, ever.

If that's what your dog requires, great. But to say "On average, an APBT when full grown needs..." is just a generalization that's not always true and IME, more often untrue.
 

_unoriginal

Cow Dog
My above post is not to say that I don't agree that it sounds as though this dog is in need of additional mental and physical stimulation.

I also urge you, Scarlettsmom, to invest in a crate to keep her in while you're not able to supervise her. It is a safer alternative to allowing her to roam free where she's proven she can't be trusted. You don't want her ingesting something toxic or eating something that can cause a potentially-fatal intestinal blockage.

There was a post here a couple years ago about a member who came home to a fire because his dog had chewed through an electrical cord.

I would also put the trash somewhere that she can't get to it. Behind a closed door or in a cabinet.

But yes, absolutely increase exercise. We can give you some tips, if you're not sure how to go about that.
 

Jazzy

GRCH Dog
I There's no set amount a dog should need to run daily to get enough exercise. It will vary greatly depending on the specific dog.

Ditto! What's key is figuring what your dog's individual needs are and then doing your best to meet them.

And :lol: at the thought of someone suggesting to V. that she run 3 miles/day.
 

Tiffseagles

GRCH Dog
Premium Member
Has anything changed in the environment? Did you move? Did someone move in/out? Is there construction work being done? Anything like that?
 
Well seems crate it is. My concern with the crate is her being in a crate 23 so hours almost everyday at this shelter. This crate was bearly bigger than her and she was there eight months. So I think she is a little traumatized from being along and being locked up. But other than that it does sound like a good idea. Just strange that she in the last two weeks all the sudden started doing this. I want the best for her so advice bring it on. We have another issue as well and that's the loving people but hating anything that's an animal. That prey instinct? With me not getting her as a puppy not sure how to nip thatin the bud! She is three times my strength and when she sees something she wants she will try to drag me after it. I have a harness on her but she's a strong one. I feel like I'm all over the place with this response. So summary crate got it! Exercise her more. Got it. I take her for walks play with tennis ball. Play fetch up and down the stairs sense it's been cold. Big question is the pulling and prey instinct. Some thing that brings me grate fullness and pain is we live in the city where houses are pulled on top of one another. I was taking her out in our own back yard and as we were walking down the walk to our door I guess it was the neighbors pitbull had gotten out and was headed straight for us. Scarlett stepped in between and protected me. It still breaks my heart and makes me cry when I think about this dog trying to attack my dog. I couldn't get him off. So I continued to pull her to my door while I'm screaming for anyone to help. I could be dying and no one cared to help. I got to my door and there still attacking one another it took every ounce of strength I had to pull her indoors and shut that scary dog out. I dropped to my knees scooped her up and saw she had wounds on her ears a few on her head and one on her head they were all superficial but it didn't matter to me. I just kept holding her and saying I'm so sorry. Even though it wasn't our fault it still to this day breaks my heart . I called the cops and you know he made his report and that was all they did. Took her to the doctor found out she was ok. But how do you heal from that. I think this has a big deal to do with why any dog makes any sudden movement she get aggressive sounding. I've never kept around any dog long enough to find out past the sounding in to action. But other than these few things she my baby girl my angel my love. She's part of me.
 
Hi and welcome to the forum. I hope you have thick skin, because most members tell it like it is. That happens to be a really good thing, because you get accurate information from people who know and love the breeds!

It sounds like she's chewing because she's bored. These dogs need a lot of physical and mental stimulation. I'd put the trash can somewhere that she can't get to it. You don't want her eating something that could cause a blockage. Don't leave anything on the floor for her to chew, and I'd crate her for now when you leave until you get it under control.

One of the most endearing things about these dogs is how they think they're little lap dogs! They thrive on affection, but that makes training easier because they really want to please us. I'd recommend a basic obedience cl$#@!. Do you have pics? We love seeing them. Do you know if she's a pedigreed dog, or a Generic Bull Breed mix?

Read the sticky threads located at the top of each topic section, especially the general dog discussion and the training & behavior. Are you aware they're prone to dog aggression DA and small animal aggression AA? This is normal, you learn to manage it should it come up. Enjoy the forum, feel free to post any questions you'd like help with.
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Lillie May

Good Dog
What a pretty girl! Don't worry about the crate, she'll only be in it for an hour or two, and it really will keep her safe. You can't love or train out the aggression, it can only be managed. Did you talk to your neighbor about their dog being out? It's good you called the police because if she's attacked again by this dog, you have a paper trail. Most of us carry something to protect our dogs and selves should this happen. Which it does.....a lot! Make a flirt pole for indoor exercise, buy puzzle toys or play find it for mental stimulation. A basic obedience class helps you learn to walk them. I have to use a pinch collar once the weather gets nice again. Mine forgets during the winter, and I use it until he's walking without pulling. Otherwise he'd just be taking me out for my daily drag.
 

Cosmic Charlie

Good Dog
W]We have another issue as well and that's the loving people but hating anything that's an animal. That prey instinct? With me not getting her as a puppy not sure how to nip thatin the bud! She is three times my strength and when she sees something she wants she will try to drag me after it. I have a harness on her but she's a strong one. I feel like I'm all over the place with this response. So summary crate got it! Exercise her more. Got it. I take her for walks play with tennis ball. Play fetch up and down the stairs sense it's been cold. Big question is the pulling and prey instinct. Some thing that brings me grate fullness and pain is we live in the city where houses are pulled on top of one another. I was taking her out in our own back yard and as we were walking down the walk to our door I guess it was the neighbors pitbull had gotten out and was headed straight for us. Scarlett stepped in between and protected me. It still breaks my heart and makes me cry when I think about this dog trying to attack my dog. I couldn't get him off. So I continued to pull her to my door while I'm screaming for anyone to help. I could be dying and no one cared to help. I got to my door and there still attacking one another it took every ounce of strength I had to pull her indoors and shut that scary dog out. I dropped to my knees scooped her up and saw she had wounds on her ears a few on her head and one on her head they were all superficial but it didn't matter to me. I just kept holding her and saying I'm so sorry. Even though it wasn't our fault it still to this day breaks my heart . I called the cops and you know he made his report and that was all they did. Took her to the doctor found out she was ok. But how do you heal from that. I think this has a big deal to do with why any dog makes any sudden movement she get aggressive sounding. I've never kept around any dog long enough to find out past the sounding in to action. But other than these few things she my baby girl my angel my love. She's part of me.

Where to begin... Ok, it doesn't matter if you had this dog from birth or at ten years old, prey drive is a common genetic trait of bull breed dogs. Genetic traits cannot be trained away, meaning they should be managed and accepted as part of the breed you own. Dog aggression is a common genetic trait of bull breeds as well. Since bull breeds are genetically predisposed towards dog aggression, when such a trait shows you must manage the dog. There are numerous ways to manage such traits, but for starters the dog must be separated from all other dogs. This is a dog and you are consistently applying your human mind to your animal and it's just not how it works. The reason your dog get's defensive if a dog approaches suddenly is due to her genetic dispositions. A bull breed dog may start showing DA at ANY moment in their lifetime and it can happen seemingly with little to no reason. It can be at 8 weeks, 6 months, 1.5 years, 5 year, 10 years and everything in between. Generally DA begins to surface around sexual maturity, which tends to be from 1.5-3 years old. Remember, there is no set guideline for when a bull dog turns on. For some bull dogs it never happens, for others early in life and others later in life. There are times where an incident may have sparked the trait, but the fact remains the genetic trait was always there, albeit lying dormant for the time being. It's better that you were made aware of the dogs genetic disposition now, rather than finding out in a horrendous manner, usually from ignorance of the breed owned. It should also be said that a dog can be selectively DA, instead of full blown DA. It's something you will need to learn, live and adjust/manage your lifestyles properly to ensure your dog and those around you are safe. Ensure you keep your dog separate from other dogs and ALWAYS keep your dog on a solid lead/collar or harness. A dog doesn't need "friends" as much as humans love to believe they do.
Also look up NILF or NILIF which is a training method and stands for "nothing in life is free." I suggest implementing it ASAP and sticking with it. Also you need to ensure this dog get's worked properly. Your dog is a bull breed which means it has lOT'S of energy and when it has no way to burn that energy, it results in the dog acting up in various ways. Your dog needs LOT'S of mental AND physical stimulation. There are endless threads on exercise ideas.

By the way, you're over analyzing the crate/shelter scenario. The dog will be fine and at the worse after a day or so of whining.
 
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Tiffseagles

GRCH Dog
Premium Member
For the reactivity, I'd suggest working with a behaviorist. I can't tell you why she's being reactive, but I can tell you most dogs improve with behavior modification and sometimes drug therapy. By improvement, I don't mean she'll start liking other dogs. I mean you'll be able to walk her down the street without her growling/barking/lunging at other dogs in the vicinity. When contacting a behaviorist, it's helpful to have a journal so you can give specifics about the behavior. Record how frequently you walk, how many dogs you saw, how far away they were, what they were doing and how your girl responded to them. This will give you a baseline so that you can see if the methods are working.

As for the crate, you have to make it a positive association. Feed her all of her meals inside of it. Play games where she goes in it. Teach her a cue to go inside. Make it fun and she'll learn to like it. Don't go too far, too fast and she should be OK. If not, alternatives are emptying a room to keep her in or training her to respect baby gates and using them instead.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
Where to begin... Ok, it doesn't matter if you had this dog from birth or at ten years old, prey drive is a common genetic trait of bull breed dogs. Genetic traits cannot be trained away, meaning they should be managed and accepted as part of the breed you own. Dog aggression is a common genetic trait of bull breeds as well. Since bull breeds are genetically predisposed towards dog aggression, when such a trait shows you must manage the dog. There are numerous ways to manage such traits, but for starters the dog must be separated from all other dogs. This is a dog and you are consistently applying your human mind to your animal and it's just not how it works. The reason your dog get's defensive if a dog approaches suddenly is due to her genetic dispositions. A bull breed dog may start showing DA at ANY moment in their lifetime and it can happen seemingly with little to no reason. It can be at 8 weeks, 6 months, 1.5 years, 5 year, 10 years and everything in between. Generally DA begins to surface around sexual maturity, which tends to be from 1.5-3 years old. Remember, there is no set guideline for when a bull dog turns on. For some bull dogs it never happens, for others early in life and others later in life. There are times where an incident may have sparked the trait, but the fact remains the genetic trait was always there, albeit lying dormant for the time being. It's better that you were made aware of the dogs genetic disposition now, rather than finding out in a horrendous manner, usually from ignorance of the breed owned. It should also be said that a dog can be selectively DA, instead of full blown DA. It's something you will need to learn, live and adjust/manage your lifestyles properly to ensure your dog and those around you are safe. Ensure you keep your dog separate from other dogs and ALWAYS keep your dog on a solid lead/collar or harness. A dog doesn't need "friends" as much as humans love to believe they do. Also look up NILF or NILIF which is a training method and stands for "nothing in life is free." I suggest implementing it ASAP and sticking with it. Also you need to ensure this dog get's worked properly. Your dog is a bull breed which means it has lOT'S of energy and when it has no way to burn that energy, it results in the dog acting up in various ways. Your dog needs LOT'S of mental AND physical stimulation. There are endless threads on exercise ideas.By the way, you're over analyzing the crate/shelter scenario. The dog will be fine and at the worse after a day or so of whining.
thank you so much this helps tremendously! I want the best for her! And with y'all helping helps so much!
 
What a pretty girl! Don't worry about the crate, she'll only be in it for an hour or two, and it really will keep her safe. You can't love or train out the aggression, it can only be managed. Did you talk to your neighbor about their dog being out? It's good you called the police because if she's attacked again by this dog, you have a paper trail. Most of us carry something to protect our dogs and selves should this happen. Which it does.....a lot! Make a flirt pole for indoor exercise, buy puzzle toys or play find it for mental stimulation. A basic obedience cl$#@! helps you learn to walk them. I have to use a pinch collar once the weather gets nice again. Mine forgets during the winter, and I use it until he's walking without pulling. Otherwise he'd just be taking me out for my daily drag.
So I feel stupid asking what a pinch collar? But yes so far it's a daily drag. As for talking to the neighbor the cops went over there and talked to them and wanted to see there dog. They said there dog had been inside on there couch with them the whole time so the officer came and got me to identify the dog. I haven't talked to them myself cause my neighborhood isn't the greatest and don't feel safe going over there especially sense what there dog did. But I did take Scarlett for a drag today lol and we played inside a lot today .. She is a cuddly lovely playful thing and I love it. She is precious looking to . And forgot to say earlier she is full blooded!
 

Tiffseagles

GRCH Dog
Premium Member
This is a pinch/prong collar:
Titan_Reg_01.jpg


I a sure she is adorable, but there's no way to tell if shes pure bred anything without paperwork (pedigree) from a responsible breeder. Shelters, veterinarians, groomers, trainers, etc. cannot tell you whether a dog is purebred.