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How do you teach one dog not to growl at the other...

Discussion in 'Training & Behavior' started by Nat Ursula, Dec 7, 2017.

  1. Nat Ursula

    Nat Ursula Good Dog

    for different reasons? For example, Teddy growled at Tonka because she got excited about getting a treat. It was like a warning growl. I didn't approve at all but I felt il equipped in knowing how to address it.
     
  2. BCdogs

    BCdogs Good Dog Staff Member Super Moderator

    Honestly, I wouldn’t even want to. It’s how they communicate both to you and to the other dog that they’re uncomfortable. In that situation, I would separate them while being fed or given treats, but I would not want to stop the warnings.
     
    TWadeJ, pitbulldogs, ETRaven2 and 3 others like this.
  3. steve07

    steve07 Good Dog

    Me personally. Everytime he growls. I would do a firm no right away. However maybe it’s a warning growl that he’s uncomfortable?
     
    Nat Ursula likes this.
  4. Nat Ursula

    Nat Ursula Good Dog

    She runs up to me for a quick pet before she gets a treat. We rarely get to pet her. Lol he didn't want her coming to me at that moment. He was hogging the pets.
     
  5. steve07

    steve07 Good Dog

    If you know that she’s going to run up to you already. Try to do it when he’s not around or keep them separate in the situation.
     
    Nat Ursula likes this.
  6. Prong collar. Great the other in front of it and when the dog starts to make a sound resembling a growl give it a good tick tick. Timing is super important. And when the dog doesn't growl reward with a treat. But mix up the quantity and type of treat each time so your dog never knows what's coming and gets eager to please because hey last time I got 1 piece of cheese but the time before that I got a while handful of meatloaf! There great tools for correction when used properly. Also take the dog out on it's own and have it sit. Give it a tick tick. Then reward and repeat to establish that the collar means good things are comming. It's also great if your dog barks at others on walks or gets excessivly excited and pulls when it sees other dogs or animals. Timing is key tho you want to do the correction to pull the dogs mind out before it's been made. Could go over a billion things you can correct with one. I only use it now when I'm taking my dog in a situation were I need him on his best behavior. If he even hears the darn thing jingle he's damn near doing back flips cause it's associated with doing fun stuff and treats or reward of some sort. Might be tuff to work into your situation but you might need to stage the scenario to do it. Be patient, train in short intervals and be black and white. Yes or no to behavior and leave emotion out of it. Don't give in to a wimper or sad face. The dog will learn if it growls then it's uncomfortable but if it doesn't then it gets treats and praise.
     
    ETRaven2 and Nat Ursula like this.
  7. ETRaven2

    ETRaven2 Little Dog

    I agree with BC on this, growling is communication. if you successfully curb the growling, there could be no warning for a bite.
    However, sounds like he's being a bully and establishing hierarchy. I would NILIF just to make sure he knows that you're the boss.
    In this instance, hogging all the attention, I'd ignore the bossy and deny petting him and reward the patience when he shares the attention.
     
    TWadeJ and Nat Ursula like this.
  8. pitbulldogs

    pitbulldogs GR CH ACE Staff Member Administrator Premium Member

    If you heard all the growling here you would probably run for the hills lol. Remember, they are dogs, that's what they do, they growl, snarl and communicate in those ways.
     
  9. Nat Ursula

    Nat Ursula Good Dog

    He is a bully! I feel bad for Tonka sometimes.
     
  10. Nat Ursula

    Nat Ursula Good Dog

    He's being a big jerk.
     
  11. ETRaven2

    ETRaven2 Little Dog

    Nat, remind me...does he resource guard (bones and stuff) I think he might be annoyed and this is the beginnings of him resource guarding you.
     
  12. Nat Ursula

    Nat Ursula Good Dog

    Yes, he has major resource guarding of real bones. He is also charging at the front door if someone knocks, rings the bell, or walks past the house.
     
    ETRaven2 likes this.
  13. ETRaven2

    ETRaven2 Little Dog

    And he's approaching about 2? Or is 2? NILIF.
    For charging the door, is he fine once the person gets in the house, or is he charging the person?
    Can you practice this by having someone ring the doorbell and then put him in a sit while you answer the door. If he stays in a sit, reward, if he gets out of the sit, put back into the sit. Is he food motivated? Will he even be redirected with food when the doorbell rings or is he too amped up?
     
  14. Nat Ursula

    Nat Ursula Good Dog

    We think he turned two in June but we really don't know. I don't know how he is if a person comes over to visit? I think we made a big mistake by not having people over at all. I know he did not handle it well when workers came into the house, but that was when he first arrived. I cannot get him to sit when he charges at the door. However, I can quickly tell the person to wait and close the door and get him in his crate with a high value treat. If he hears the voice he barks and growls. He does settle down in his crate and wait quietly to come back out.
     
    ETRaven2 likes this.
  15. ETRaven2

    ETRaven2 Little Dog

    Do you want him to be able to sit and wait at the door, or would you rather him crated?
    If you want him to sit and wait at the door, start him on lead, get him in a sit/stay and open door without anyone there. If he gets up, put his ass back in a sit/stay. Treat/praise when he is there. Repeat, ad nauseum...
    Did you guys go thru ob with him? He sound like he is a fireball of energy that turns into aggressive-ness when not released. I'd get his butt into agility, sounds like he'd love it.
     
  16. Nat Ursula

    Nat Ursula Good Dog

    I don't know how to get him into classes because he is so dog reactive.
     
  17. Nat Ursula

    Nat Ursula Good Dog

    We have put him in a sit stay outside in our backyard over and over again. 99% off the time he follows us if we step away.

    He is not very coordinated why do you think he would like agility. Tonka like it a lot. We could only do a couple of classes with her b cause of her recurrent skin infections.

    He should be doing dock diving or something else for sure.
     
  18. ETRaven2

    ETRaven2 Little Dog

    I think agility would work his brain so much, he'd be exhausted, add that with the physical demands of agility, and he would crash.
    As for dog reactivity...how bad is it? Raven's threshold was about 20 feet. Anything closer than that and she's lose her ever loving mind.
     
  19. Nat Ursula

    Nat Ursula Good Dog

    It seems like he loses it if he sees a dog. Very rarely does he barely react. He doesn't like it if a dog looks at him. However, we were at the Vet a while ago and there was this sick older Chi and it was looking at Teddy, etc. and he didn't react at all. It has something to do with their energy levels too.
     
    ETRaven2 likes this.
  20. ETRaven2

    ETRaven2 Little Dog

    Yep, I've experienced that and understand all too well. Once I was at vet with Ray, sans muzzle, this is before I really understood she needed it everywhere, and this big old friendly goofy golden, wanted to play with her so badly, ignoring the snapping, growling and noises from the gut that said "I will take your head off". I kept telling the young couple, who had their dog on a retractable, that Raven did not want to be friends and to keep their dog away from mine. They blatantly ignored me. Finally, after almost choking Raven out because she was losing it so bad, and nowhere to go, because the dog had us pretty much boxed in, the lady from behind the counter came out, grabbed their dog by the collar and walked him over to the couple and said, (about Raven) "that dog does not want your dog in it's space, please hold him".
    That's when we started doing a sweep of the waiting room, or just going in through the back. But, then we still had to muzzle because she hated the vet and staff.
    So Teddy, needs to drain some damn energy mentally and is too dog reactive to do normal dog sport stuff. What about Denise Fenzi classes online? She does a lot of trick dog stuff, but it's fun and drains them mentally. That's what I ended up doing with Raven to get out that pent up drive.
    You could always get into WP or something with him too, where there are more owners there that understand DA.
     
    Nat Ursula likes this.

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