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Help, advice needed!

Discussion in 'Health & Nutritional Care' started by Vern, Apr 16, 2018.

  1. Vern

    Vern Puppy

    My oldest Pit, 8 years of age has not been acting right for a few weeks now. He is showing signs of distemper, but it was not diagnosed by the vet. She gave no diagnosis for the following symptoms. If you have any ideas, please feel free to comment.
    Symptoms:
    -uncontrolled blatter
    -shaking and skittish
    -weight loss/loss of appetite
    -depressed
    -aggression towards others/growling/snarling
    -no energy
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 16, 2018
  2. Michele

    Michele Chi Super Dog Staff Member Administrator

    Did your vet do blood work, physical, etc??
     
    Nat Ursula likes this.
  3. ETRaven2

    ETRaven2 Big Dog

    Could be a number of things. I echo Michelle, was bloodwork done? How is WBC? RBC? Liver and kidney function?
    My thoughts take me from thyroid to cancer.
     
    Nat Ursula likes this.
  4. Vern

    Vern Puppy

    Blood came back good, except for the PLT, vet says that his white count is down significantly from what it should be. But there is no sign of infection. Now a month and a half ago I found him in the backyard chasing a raccoon. Whether or not he touched it or not I am unsure of. All 3 of my Pit's go outside separately and stay outside for no more than 10 minutes at a time. Today I noticed that he could not control his bladder. He urinated from the dining room to the kitchen door, he showed no sign of knowing that he was urinating in the house.
     
  5. Nat Ursula

    Nat Ursula Good Dog

    I'm so sorry your dog is not doing well. This was the only thing that I could think of.

    Leptospirosis
     
  6. Nat Ursula

    Nat Ursula Good Dog

    Diagnosing Leptospirosis in Dogs
    Because leptospirosis is a zoonotic disease, your veterinarian will be especially cautious when handling your pet, and will strongly advise you to do the same. Protective latex gloves must be worn at all times, and all body fluids will be treated as a biologically hazardous material. Urine, semen, post-abortion discharge, vomit, and any fluid that leaves the body will need to be handled with extreme caution.

    You will need to give a thorough history of your dog's health, including a background history of symptoms, recent activities, and possible incidents that might have precipitated this condition. The history you provide may give your veterinarian clues as to what stage of infection your dog is experiencing, and which organs are being most affected.

    Your veterinarian will order a chemical blood profile, a complete blood count, a urinalysis, an electrolyte panel, and a fluorescent antibody urine test. Urine and blood cultures will also be ordered for examining the prevalence of the bacteria. A microscopic agglutination test, or titer test, will also be performed to measure the body's immune response to the infection, by measuring the presence of antibodies in the bloodstream. This will help to definitively identify leptospira spirochetes and the level of systemic infection.

    Treatment for Leptospirosis in Dogs

    Dogs with acute severe disease should be hospitalized. Fluid therapy will be the primary treatment, in order to reverse any effects of dehydration. If your dog has been vomiting, an anti-vomiting drug, called an antiemetic, may be administered, and a gastric tube can be used to nourish your dog if its inability to eat or keep food down continues. A blood transfusion may also be necessary if your dog has been severely hemorrhaging.

    Antibiotics will be prescribed by your veterinarian, with the type of antibiotic dependent on the stage of infection. Penicillins can be used for initial infections, but they are not effective for eliminating the bacteria once it has reached the carrier stage. Tetracyclines, fluoroquinolones, or similar antibiotics will be prescribed for this stage, since they are better distributed into the bone tissue. Antibiotics will be prescribed for a course of at least four weeks. Some antibiotics can have side effects that appear serious, especially those drugs that go deeper into the system to eliminate infection. Be sure to read all of the warnings that come with the prescription, and talk to your veterinarian about the indications you will need to watch for. Prognosis is generally positive, barring severe organ damage.
     
    ETRaven2 likes this.
  7. pitbulldogs

    pitbulldogs OHMUHGERD Staff Member Administrator

    Might be time for a new Vet..
     
    Nat Ursula, ETRaven2 and Michele like this.
  8. Vern

    Vern Puppy

    Blood work came back good, all but the white blood count. Today is the first day that he has not eaten anything. He also urinated on the floor with having no knowledge of doing so.

    Yes, I believe that it is time for a new vet as well, for the last 8 years the vet has treated him like a child. A quick look over and the monitor of his behavior. It is almost like over the years he has stopped caring about my dog's health. There is an animal hospital about 45 minutes away from my residence, I called this morning to bring him in. This will be the first time that I have ever had to muzzle or use a short leash due to breed. He does not mind it but I find it cruel.
     
    pitbulldogs likes this.
  9. Michele

    Michele Chi Super Dog Staff Member Administrator

    Please keep us updated. And a muzzle/leash is not cruel.
     
    pitbulldogs likes this.
  10. Nat Ursula

    Nat Ursula Good Dog

    I hope they can help him. Please let us know.
     
  11. Vern

    Vern Puppy

    I have not one time placed a muzzle around his snout, he has never given or showed a sign of ever needing to. I carry a leash on me at all times, sometimes there is no need to wear it. He chases no animals, wild or domestic, does not bark back to other dogs. He is cat-friendly, toddler-friendly etc. Its when a stranger that he has never seen enters his home he becomes more territorial. This September will be nine years since he fell into my lap as an abandoned premature puppy, maybe 4 weeks to 5 weeks old. I did hand feed him until he was able to eat on his own. He has been spoiled ever since toys, treats, stuffed animals, you name it. Never caged, crated, or chained inside or out. He has helped me train my other 2 who follow an have learned from him, to potty outside, baths, when I leave I come back and stopped the youngest from chewing objects when she was teething. To some people around me he is a dog, but to me, he is my best friend. I will let everyone know how the Animal hospital goes, I thank everyone for the support through this tuff time.
     
    Nat Ursula likes this.
  12. Nat Ursula

    Nat Ursula Good Dog

    I'd be surprised if a muzzle would even bother him if he is that easy going.
     
  13. ETRaven2

    ETRaven2 Big Dog

    I get it. I just lost my heart dog at the age of 2.5. SHe was muzzled often and honestly, it never bothered her. If it's going to get better care for your dog, I think muzzling for a few hours is a small price to pay. Please keep us in the loop. Sending good vibes your way.
     
    Nat Ursula likes this.

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