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Health Testing

Discussion in 'American Bully Health' started by CelticKarma, Jul 8, 2011.

  1. CelticKarma

    CelticKarma Good Dog

    PennHIP ~ A radiographic method of measuring a dog's passive hip laxity (looseness of the joint). The dog is given a Distraction Index (DI) number between 0 and 1. A DI closer to 0 would mean little or no joint laxity and less likelihood of developing Canine Hip Dysplasia (CHD). The closer DI is to 1 the more laxity and therefore greater CHD susceptibility.
    This can be performed on dogs aged 4 months and up. This test does require anesthesia.
    Developed by the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine.
    PennHIP's mission is to develop and apply evidence based technology to direct appropriate breeding strategies aimed at reducing in frequency and severity the osteoarthritis of canine hip dysplasia. The beneficiaries of this effort will be the many dogs who suffer with this controllable genetic disease and, of course, the dogs' owners.


    OFA ~ The Orthopedic Foundation For Animals, Inc. A private non-profit foundation formed in 1966 to collate and disseminate information concerning orthopedic and genetic diseases of animal, to advise, encourage and establish control programs to lower the incidence of orthopedic and genetic diseases and to encourage and finance research in orthopedic and genetic disease in animals.

    OFA Hips ~ Owners can submit hip x-rays to the OFA and have them evaluated for Canine Hip Dysplasia (CHD). The OFA gives them a category of Excellent, Good, Fair (these 3 are normal hips) or Borderline, Mild Dysplasia, Moderate Dysplasia or Severe Dysplasia. Must be at least 24 months old for official certification, although preliminary evaluations are possible between 4 and 24 months. For best results this test should be done with the pet well-sedated.

    OFA Elbows ~ Owners can submit elbow x-rays to the OFA to be evaluated for elbow dysplasia. They receive a rating of normal or abnormal. Abnormal scores are further divided into Grade I, Grade II or Grade III. Must be at least 24 months old for official certification although preliminary evaluations are possible between 12 and 24 months.


    OFA Cardiac ~ Owners can have their dog examined for congenital heart disease and receive OFA certification and a breed number from OFA stating the dog is normal or affected. Must be at least 12 months old for official certification, but OFA provisional certification is possible for dogs between 6 weeks and 12 months of age. This provisional certification is great for breeders to do before selling a puppy and for assessment of the breeding potential of a dog.
    San Diego Area Veterinary Cardiologist - UC Davis Veterinary Medical Center - 858.875.7505


    OFA Patellas ~ Owners can have their dogs evaluated for patellar luxation (slippage/rotation of the kneecap) and receive OFA certification and a breed number. This is a manual examination. Dogs receive a classification of normal or abnormal, with abnormal being further divided into 4 grades. Must be at least 12 months old for official certification, but OFA provisional certification is possible for dogs between 6 weeks and 12 months of age. Again, this provisional certification is great for breeders to do before selling a puppy and for assessment of the breeding potential of a dog.


    OFA Thyroid ~ A blood serum test can be done to determine if a dog has thyroid abnormalities. There are two types of thyroid abnormalities covered by OFA:
    1. Autoimmune Thyroiditis (known to be heritable)
    2. Idiopathically Reduced Thyroid Function
    Dogs receive a category of Normal, Abnormal or Equivocal (equivocal meaning the results were not definitive and retesting in 3-6 months is recommended). Normal dogs are issued OFA certification and a breed number. OFA recommends the dogs be recertified (no OFA charge for recertification) at 2,3,4,6 and 8 years old since the classification can change as the dogs age. Dogs must be at least 12 m onths old.

    CERF ~ Canine Eye Registration Foundation. The Canine Eye Registration Foundation (CERF) is an organization that was founded by a group of concerned, purebred owner/breeders who recognized that the quality of their dog's lives were being affected by heritable eye disease. Dedicated to the elimination of heritable eye disease in purebred dogs through registration and research. There is NO minimum age requirement. The certification is good for 12 months from the date of the exam.
    CERF contact info: phone: 765-494-8179
    ~This is a painless examination of the dogs eyes, if free of inheritable eye disease you dog can be certified.BAER ~ The BAER (Brain Auditory Evoked Response) test is a safe and painless testing device to determine if a dog has a hearing loss. A BAER test is performed by placing a insert earphone into the ear canal, while recording needle electrodes are inserted in the skin at the base of each ear. Each ear is tested individually. A series of one thousand clicks are transmitted via the earphone to stimulate a response. The response is detected by the needle electrodes, transmitted to the BAER device, where it is recorded. The click series starts at 70 decibels and is gradually increased to 105 decibels (if hearing is not detected at the lower levels).
    By recording the response signals from the needle electrodes, the BAER device can then produce a graphic display of the dog's hearing responses.
    This can be performed on dogs as early as 5 weeks.

    American Bully Breeding/Health Information
     

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