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Foster dog structure concerns

BlueBaloo

Big Dog
So we are fostering this poor dog, around 1.5 years old, mostly deaf, and seems to have some structural issues and I'm wondering if there's anything we could be doing to help. Glucosamine? More/less exercise? He's a very mellow dog. He had heartworms and they said that the treatment took a lot out of him, so he tires easily. But he's such a sweetheart and sweet with other dogs and being deaf seems not to phase him much. haha Sorry for the low quality pictures, I forgot to take them while we were outside.

Here's a picture: look familiar?


He does this sometimes when he stands.. very strange


He has a roached looking back too..

 

Leslie H

Good Dog
I hate to say it, but that turned under foot may be neurological or nerve problems. You need to see a vet, that looks like a potentially serious person.
 

FransterDoo

Big Dog
shoot I agree with Leslie. That can typically be a sign of a neurological problem. My terrier mix has sterile meningitis that's currently in remission.

Here's where you can find a certified neurologist:
Find a Specialist
 

_unoriginal

Cow Dog
Maybe a ligament/tendon issue? A spasm?

I really don't know anything about that. I mostly wanted to say oh my, what a handsome boy.
 

BlueBaloo

Big Dog
shoot I agree with Leslie. That can typically be a sign of a neurological problem. My terrier mix has sterile meningitis that's currently in remission.

Here's where you can find a certified neurologist:
Find a Specialist
I hate to say it, but that turned under foot may be neurological or nerve problems. You need to see a vet, that looks like a potentially serious person.

Really? I would have never guessed. It's only sometimes, like he doesn't walk with it hanging like that, just while he standing at rest. Does that change anything? haha
 

Beki

Good Dog
Premium Member
Very handsome indeed!., How long ago was his last spinal injection to treat the heartworms?
 

BlueBaloo

Big Dog
I can ask but I think he's only been available for adoption for a couple weeks so probably less than a month ago?

Sent from my XT907 using Tapatalk
 

FransterDoo

Big Dog
Really? I would have never guessed. It's only sometimes, like he doesn't walk with it hanging like that, just while he standing at rest. Does that change anything? haha

In my experience, not really. If he's standing properly and you lightly pick up his foot and place it so he is standing like in the photo (with the top of his paw connecting to the ground) - how long does it take for him to flip it back to the correct position?

It's sometimes called "the knuckling test" or the "degenerative myelopothy test" and can indicate proprioceptive deficit

Step 4 has a video showing the test: Neurologic Exam
 

BlueBaloo

Big Dog
I tried that neuro exam but he just kept pulling his foot out of my hand. I'll try again when he's a little more calm

Sent from my XT907 using Tapatalk
 

BlueBaloo

Big Dog
Took him to the vet yesterday and he seems to think its joint pain, because manipulating his hips made him cry out. He gave me some pain relief/ anti inflammatory and also said some glucosamine supplements would help. And I'm good with getting that since I was planning on starting meesha on joint supplements anyways. Any recommendations? With chondrotin or MSM? Is there any benefit to the ones made specifically for dogs? Vet said 1500mg daily for amount.

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Jamielvsaustin

Good Dog
We started giving this to Bailey after she had x-rays done that showed HD and arthritis in her wrists. We saw such an improvement we were able to stop giving her pain medication and decided to put Trooper on it as a sort of preventative measure. It took about a month before we saw improvement. But now she doesn't limp after a walk...if we take her for a longer walk she may limp-but not for as long as before (1-2 days). I just bought a 120 pill bottle for around $45 from our vet (Banfield).
http://www.schuylerproducts.com/hannah_rejuvenate.html
 

Michele

Chi Super Dog
Administrator
I will suggest Turmeric. It's a human herb but is great for dogs and acts as an anti-flammatory. Please check with your vet first.

It comes in capsule form. You can empty half the capsule in with his food.
 
The supplement Jamie linked looks like a good one. Hyaluronic acid really makes a difference in joint health. I personally use InClover's Connectin powder for Riddle. Similar ingredient list to the one linked. I won't switch Riddle off it- I tried once to switch her to another supposedly good (and more expensive) supplement. Within 2 weeks Riddle was lame and started refusing to jump off the couch or go down the stairs. Switched back to Connectin and she went back to normal.
 

Jamielvsaustin

Good Dog
In my experience, not really. If he's standing properly and you lightly pick up his foot and place it so he is standing like in the photo (with the top of his paw connecting to the ground) - how long does it take for him to flip it back to the correct position?

It's sometimes called "the knuckling test" or the "degenerative myelopothy test" and can indicate proprioceptive deficit

Step 4 has a video showing the test: Neurologic Exam

Franster what is proprioceptive deficit? We have a friend who thinks their dog might have DM. (sorry to hijack)
 

Leslie H

Good Dog
I think proprioception is knowing where your body is in space, knowing the position of your head, limbs, how your weight is shifted, etc.
 

CrazyK9

Good Dog
I've been giving my old lady GlycoFlex III. Shes had arthritis for a while though never really showd symptoms in every day life so I havent noticed any difference.
 

FransterDoo

Big Dog
I think proprioception is knowing where your body is in space, knowing the position of your head, limbs, how your weight is shifted, etc.

Thereabouts. So if the dog leaves the paw upside down it can indicate that there is an issue with the nervous system letting the paw and the brain talk.

Sent from my HTCEVOV4G using Tapatalk 2
 

BlueBaloo

Big Dog
Thanks for all the help guys. He definitely just lets his foot be upside down if I put it that way so I guess he's got some issues. The vet hasn't addressed it but I don't know if he has really seen it. Whenever they have a problem, they never seem to do it for the vet, you know?

But his joint pain seems to be getting a lot better! I got him liquid Glucosamine for dogs : Amazon.com : Liquid Health K-9 Glucosamine with OptiMSM, Hip and Joint Formula, 32-Ounce Unit : Pet Bone And Joint Supplements : Kitchen Dining
A little too expensive for my taste, but I've heard the pills for humans aren't metabolized well. Thoughts on that?

He is actually bending his knees and is able to squat to poop like a normal dog! Big progress for him.We put some weight on him but hopefully not too much to aggravate the joints.

We have had our fair share of people really interested in him but once they hear he's deaf they disregard him. Don't they know it's a benefit??? haha he doesn't bark at random noises, he sleeps like a rock, he's calm and collected even if all the other dogs are going bananas. It's great! He's been learning sign language and is very smart and eager to learn.

Here are some pictures!