1. Welcome to Pit Bull Chat!

    We are a diverse group of Pit Bull enthusiasts devoted to the preservation of the American Pit Bull Terrier.

    Our educational and informational discussion forum about the American Pit Bull Terrier and all other bull breeds is a venue for members to discuss topics, share ideas and come together with the common goal to preserve and promote our canine breed of choice.

    Here you will find discussions on topics concerning health, training, events, rescue, breed specific legislation and history. We are the premier forum for America’s dog, The American Pit Bull Terrier.

    We welcome you and invite you to join our family.

    You are currently viewing our boards as a guest which gives you limited access to view most discussions and access our other features. By joining our free community, you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload content and access many other features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today!

    If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please contact us.

    Dismiss Notice

Crate Training by Huskylove

Discussion in 'Training & Behavior' started by Mollie's Nana, Jun 10, 2010.

  1. Mollie's Nana

    Mollie's Nana Krypto Super Dog Staff Member Super Moderator

    How to Crate Train Your Dog

    Otherwise Known As How To Keep Your Dog Safe and Your Sanity Intact!

    Used properly, crate training has become an invaluable tool for dogs and their people. It provides your dog with a safe, cozy den of it's own, and gives you peace of mind that your dog can be left safely unattended for short periods of time. Here are the basics to get you started.

    Choosing the Right Crate
    There are several different styles of crates available today. There are airline cargo styles, hard sided, with two pieces (top and bottom), that can be separated. This style crate usually has one or two heavy grate doors, are very sturdy, and can be used for transporting a dog in-flight if need be.
    The second crate style is a wire mesh crate, open on all four sides for good ventilation, with a plastic pan on the bottom. This crate can also have one or more doors, and many of them are foldable for easy transport and storage.
    Even if you have a 15 pound puppy, choose the crate that will accommodate the dog as a full grown adult comfortably. It should be large enough for the dog to stand up in, turn around, and sleep with some leg room.
    When you start out with a puppy, make the crate small enough with a divider (either the one that comes with the crate, or even a box will do), so that the puppy has just enough room to once again turn around and sleep in comfortably. Adjust the crate size as the puppy grows.

    Training the Dog To Accept His New Home
    Set the crate up in a part of the house that has some traffic and activity, the kitchen is usually a good spot, but wherever the family congregates the most is fine. Leave the crate door open, and allow the dog to inspect it at his leisure. Then take a really good treat, chicken or hotdogs work well, and hold it in the crate, or throw it in gently, and allow the dog to get his treat. When the dog goes into the crate to retrieve his goodie, say a command as he's walking in, such as "Crate up" or Kennel Up". Be sure to use the same command every time. Then when the pup becomes comfortable walking in, shut the gate behind him. Only keep the pup in for a minute, and then let him out, once again, praising him profusely. Keep doing this, lengthening the time by several minutes each time. If the pup starts to whine or cry, do not let him out! That will only teach the pup that crying is a way to get out. Instead, wait until he stops, even if it's for a moment, and then let him out, telling him what a good pup he is. He will soon make the connection that quiet = out. One good idea is also to make sure the pup has a good play session before crate training, so that he is tired, and may go in more willingly to lay down.
    Once the dog has accepted the crate, put him in for short periods throughout the day, so that he becomes accustomed to going in. You just may find that after a few days, he'll go into his den without any asking on your part! Putting a suitable toy in the crate is fine as well, anything you can do to make his home more inviting is good. An old shirt of yours will also make the pup feel more at ease, but only when supervised, or if you know he won't shred it.

    The rule of thumb for crating time is for however many months of age the pup is, you can add on an hour, i.e. if the pup is 4 months old, you can crate him for 5 hours. But please keep in mind that this is only a guideline, and all dogs should have plenty of exercise and free time to balance out the crating!
    Once you've crate trained your pup, you won't know how you did without it before!



    Copyright © 2000 Laura Waddell, K9Problemsolvers
     
  2. I'm going to include this in the training links I send to adopter applicants :)
     
  3. LeannaC

    LeannaC Puppy

    This was VERY helpful! I am working with our new puppy and trying to get her used to her crate. As of now, she hates it.
     
  4. destinoscelgo

    destinoscelgo Good Dog

    My raja did too. Now he goes in willingly =)
     
  5. Stonesthroen

    Stonesthroen Puppy

    Mine doesn't really mind the crate. She is good about sleeping in it but she will always throw the puppy eyes and the little whining before going to bed to see if i will cave in and let her out so she can sleep in our bed.
     
  6. Clover has been crated in my office next to my desk since we got her at 6 weeks. She is fed in her crate also, and it is her chosen refuge in our busy household. If I need to confine her in the crate all I have to do is say "crate" and she's in there. It was a godsend during the worst of her chewing months, especially since we also have two small boys who strew chewable toys like rice at a wedding.
     
  7. RockyTj

    RockyTj Puppy

    My pup is 2 1/2 months old, we've had him one month with us, we didn't know he needed to be crated, Im gonna talk with my husband about it, right now he's used to sleeping in his spot, with a blanket. I'll see how it goes the whole crate thing in the next months.
     
  8. PDX_Bull

    PDX_Bull Puppy

    I am just crate training my 3 month-old one. He's fine with everything about the crate as long a) the door is open or b) he's too busy to mind the closed door. But if he decides he wants to leave, he'll start whining and barking like hell, and I'm really concerned about my neighbors (apartment building). I really appreciate the reminder about teaching the dog that silent = out sooner.
     
  9. PDX_Bull

    PDX_Bull Puppy

    I have a couple of detail questions. Maybe they fit in here well.

    1. I get the idea of letting the pup out when he interrupts his whining. Is it okay to praise him (but not let him out) when he shuts up? Or is it better to ignore him entirely when he's in the crate?

    2. I hear diverging opinions on how much to praise when letting him out. Right now, our crate routine is this: "Crate up!" and half treat tossed into the crate so he goes in --> Praise, close door --> Praise more and give other half treat through the closed door -->Occasionally praise when not whining --> Let out when not whining, praise (but no treat). Does this sound sensible?

    Thanks for your input!
     
  10. Mack-Diesel

    Mack-Diesel Puppy

    Appreciate the post thanks!
     
  11. DopeyLaDiva

    DopeyLaDiva Puppy

    Today is Day 3 of crate training my puppy, he's doing great. His whining is only when he wakes up in the morning or after I take him out at 6am and return him to his crate so I can get an extra couple hours of sleep but I found putting a sheet folded over a few times seems to work. I just put it over the crate when I put him in and he is calmed. I think it's just the thought of being in a confined space with the big room around him is what makes him nervous.
    It's pretty distinct cries between the "I'm bored in my crate" and "I HAVE TO POTTY" whines so I know when to jump out of bed. Plus he's on a pretty strict schedule, bedtime and everything

    ---------- Post added at 10:14 PM ---------- Previous post was at 10:12 PM ----------

    Today is Day 3 of crate training my puppy, he's doing great. His whining is only when he wakes up in the morning or after I take him out at 6am and return him to his crate so I can get an extra couple hours of sleep but I found putting a sheet folded over a few times seems to work. I just put it over the crate when I put him in and he is calmed. I think it's just the thought of being in a confined space with the big room around him is what makes him nervous.
    It's pretty distinct cries between the "I'm bored in my crate" and "I HAVE TO POTTY" whines so I know when to jump out of bed. Plus he's on a pretty strict schedule, bedtime and everything
     
  12. Sinfulremedy

    Sinfulremedy Puppy

    Could an older dog take to crate training as well?
     
  13. pookie!

    pookie! GRCH Dog

    Yep !! :)
     
  14. lvictorica

    lvictorica Puppy

    I just adopted a one year old Pit from the Shelter. How do I adjust him into his new home/crate? I will try the technics, but will he associate the crate with the shelter he came from?
     
  15. Jim

    Jim Good Dog

    Make him feel like it is his home. Somewhere that is enjoyable,safe. He won't associate it with anything other than what you want him to associate it with.
     
  16. SLEDGE

    SLEDGE Puppy

    Great info. Just got my pitbull pup today; I'm just soaking all this info. in
     
  17. Jada's mommy

    Jada's mommy Puppy

    We adopted Jada when she was 8 weeks old. At first, she hated having to go into the crate. She would cry and yelp for a good 15 - 20 minutes each time - this stopped after about 2 months.

    While training - anytime she would voluntarily walk into her crate, we would get all excited, tell her good girl, and give her a treat. We also fed her in the crate to make her understand that it is a good place not a punishment. We left a blanket and some toys in there with her too.

    Now - all we have to do is say "crate" and she walks right in and lays down.
     
  18. growinupinfl

    growinupinfl Puppy

    I have a question about crating a dog. What about at night. I don't know about you but I like to sleep. If I have a 2 month old puppy, I do not think I can bring myself to wake up enough to take them out every two hours. Heck that is why I breast fed my four children, little conscious time as possible.

    The little guy I just got yesterday is oddly comfortable with his crate . I'm wondering if he was crated with his mother. He seems to know it is his sleeping spot, and likes to hang out in there. Or shall I say sleep because that seems to be his main priority right now. Last night he went to his box around midnight, he did not whimper or make a sound till almost 8. He went potty came back in my husband set him down in our room, where the crate is, he walked back to his crate and passed back out till 10. I leave the door open unless I'm asleep or for the one hour I was gone today, and he had gone back in to sleep anyways. Is this normal for a 6 wks old dog, and at some point should I worry about him spending too much time in his crate?

    Odd question I know.
     
  19. omgrobyn

    omgrobyn GRCH Dog

    Be thankful he likes his crate.

    Sent from my HTC-PG762 using Tapatalk 2
     
  20. Perky

    Perky Puppy

    From day 1 my pup has slept in the kennel. She loves it...I say this because she goes in it willingly at times-I keep it nice n cozy for her. She has bedding in there that is washed regularly along with her favorite stuffed animal. At night, all I have to say is "kennel" and on most nights she goes in without a problem....those other nights she's just not ready for bed, she jumps on her bean bag at which point I drag the bean bag to her kennel-I call that the "bean bag express" and then she gets the point..lol

    funny thing-One evening when we finished cleaning the kennel,my daughter wanted to see how it felt to be inside...lol..and she got in it and had me close it and everything...I thought it was hilarious, but I was entertained with the thought that my daughter wanted to see things felt from our dog's point of view. It was so funny to see her in there and the pup on the outside looking in like, "hey! that's my kennel!". Our pup even pawed at the latch to try to open it! it was so funny! I told my daughter that was a first and last! She said it was comfortable...
     

Share This Page