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Chaining Info

Discussion in 'General Dog Discussions' started by EDOGZ818, Apr 7, 2008.

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  1. EDOGZ818

    EDOGZ818 Big Dog

    A 5\16" chain is too large for any dog and causes unnecessary strain. If you have a problem with your dogs breaking their chain, increase the grade of the chain, not the size of it.
    • A grade 30, 5\16" chain has a working load limit of 1,900lbs and weighs 0.924lbs per foot. A ten foot chain would weigh 9.24lbs.
    • A grade 43, 1\4" chain has a working load limit of 2,600lbs and weighs 0.65lbs per foot. A ten foot chain would weigh 6.5lbs.
    • A grade 70, 1\4" chain has a working load limit of 3,150lbs and weighs 0.67lbs per foot. A ten foot chain would weigh 6.7lbs.
    • A grade 80, 9\32" chain has a working load limit of 3,500lbs and weighs 0.72lbs per foot. A ten foot chain would weigh 7.2lbs.
    • A grade 100, 9\32" chain has a working load limit of 4,300lbs and weighs 0.72lbs per foot. A ten foot chain would weigh 7.2lbs.
    The higher the grade, the stronger and more durable the material is. If you buy the chain at a hardware store, it will be marked by grade.

    A grade 30 chain is silver in color, grade 43 is a little darker and looks to sparkle, grade 70 is originally a gold color, but after wear, it turns the same color as grade 43, both grade 80 and grade 100 chains are black in color. Depending on the manufacturer, some may be stamped with 3, 30 or 300 for grade 30, 4, 43 or 430 for grade 43, 7, 70 or 700 for grade 70, 8, 80 or 800 for grade 80, 10, 100 or 1000 for grade 100; though many manufacturers do not.
    • Grade 30 (Proof Coil Chain): General purpose, low carbon steel chain. Used in a wide range of applications. Not to be used in overhead lifting.
    • Grade 43 (High Test Chain): A high carbon steel chain widely used in industry, construction, agricultural and lumbering operations. Not to be used in overhead lifting.
    • Grade 70 (Transport Chain): A high quality, high strength carbon steel chain used for load securement. Not to be used in overhead lifting.
    • Grade 80 (Alloy Chain): Premium quality, high strength alloy chain, heat treated, used in a variety of sling and tie down applications. For overhead lifting applications, only Alloy Chain should be used.
    • Grade 100 (Alloy Chain): Premium quality, highest strength alloy chain, heat treated, used in a variety of sling and tie down applications. For overhead lifting applications, only Alloy Chain should be used.
    Posted by:
    " SHON "

    Edited by:
    " EDOGZ818 "
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 7, 2008
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