Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 50
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Ontario, Canada.. eh!
    Posts
    2,716

    Bad conformation... no hock/stifle?

    Hades has terrible conformation, the most obvious problem to me at least being how "straight in the back" he is. Seems to me he has a sway back too.

    With all of the conformation people here and people read on breeding/lines etc, I was just looking for opinions on first off; The health concern, Hades hasn't had any injuries to date and he's an active dog, but what issues a dog this straight could lead to and if possible how this would come about, if it's a known problem in certain breedings/lines etc.

    I'm not a fairy and I know it's a terrible fault, so it won't hurt my feelings to say so. :)

    The most recent semi-stacked shot of him. It's hard to stack a dog nicely and take the picture, lol: Hades wants to go play and not stand there like a turd anymore! :) Notice no hock whatsoever, it's so weird, makes it hard to place his back feet too.




    A shot from the back end with him stretched out.






    It doesn't impair him though in anyway. :D


    A shot more from more in front:



    Just interested in hearing honest opinions about him. Obviously Hades is not a purebred APBT. Love to hear just fun guesses on what he is.

    I have a few pictures of his sire, not great ones but none of his mother. My best guess at his dam would be a SBT, she was just so darned small.

  2. #2
    Eeek. I'm always so uncomfortable watching dogs that straight in the back end moving around. Freaks me out just watching them move. :eek: I'm no expert, but I'd imagine he might be prone to ACL tears or luxating patellas.

    You know... I notice alot of staffy bulls to be really straight in the back end like that.

  3. #3
    Looks normal to me. But i'm not an expert.

  4. Dogs with such straight rears tend to be prone to ACL tears.

  5. #5
    Oh well now I see his rear end up a little

  6. #6
    That is not normal at all. As Zoe said that dog is probably more prone to ACL tears and issue with knees and I wouldn't be surprised if hip issues arise from being so straight in the rear.

  7. #7
    it means he is lazy

  8. #8
    I was just thinking that as well.... the hip issues. I remember my foster Piglet was the same. TOTALLY straight in the back end and the way she walked... it looked like she would put alot of stress on her hips over time.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Ontario, Canada.. eh!
    Posts
    2,716
    He definitely has a funny walk to him. He moves out fine, but his walk looks like he's got a pickle stuck up his $#@!! :)

    From being around dogs so much I've heard a lot of pit type dogs having ACL problems, but Hades, as active as he is has never had an issue. When I finally realized a few years back what was so weird with him I was in shock as to how he hadn't had any serious injuries. He's an active dog, one other trainer I know who has a decently put together pit mix recently spent $5000 on surgery from an agility injury.

    Oddly enough his dam, which I suspect was a SBT had hock, it was his sire, some type of bully mix was the one lacking hock/stifle.

    It is creepy though isn't it Zoe!?!? lol

    Is there any way to prevent ACL problems? Should he not do the things he's always done?

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by K9 Love View Post
    but his walk looks like he's got a pickle stuck up his $#@!! :)
    That is exactly it!

  11. #11
    These are suggestions so take them as you will:

    1. Limit some of his activity such as jumping around that kind of activity is $#@! knees as it is but when he's as straight as he is I wouldn't risk it.
    2. Take some weight off - nor more than 3-5 pounds. That will help take some stress off his knees.
    3. If you are able to do a lot of swimming exercises to tone up his thigh muscles. They will help support his hips as they could possibly have issues later down the road.

    As I said these are merely suggestions. I have had too many friends whose dogs have suffered from HD and ACL tears and let me tell you they are expensive and a PITA to deal with.

    I would like to add that Mater has bowed legs in the rear which cause him to walk different too. I try to limit the kind of exercise he gets so that an ACL tear will hopefully not occur. But I have a feeling that we will have HD issues down the road as he gets older.
    Last edited by mstngchic2012; 12-29-2010 at 11:02 PM.

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by K9 Love View Post
    He definitely has a funny walk to him. He moves out fine, but his walk looks like he's got a pickle stuck up his $#@!! :)

    From being around dogs so much I've heard a lot of pit type dogs having ACL problems, but Hades, as active as he is has never had an issue. When I finally realized a few years back what was so weird with him I was in shock as to how he hadn't had any serious injuries. He's an active dog, one other trainer I know who has a decently put together pit mix recently spent $5000 on surgery from an agility injury.

    Oddly enough his dam, which I suspect was a SBT had hock, it was his sire, some type of bully mix was the one lacking hock/stifle.

    It is creepy though isn't it Zoe!?!? lol



    Is there any way to prevent ACL problems? Should he not do the things he's always done?
    This, er, pickle issue. Does it manifest itself in a pronounced wiggle at a sedate walk? Like a hip swaying Senorita.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Ontario, Canada.. eh!
    Posts
    2,716
    Quote Originally Posted by mstngchic2012 View Post
    These are suggestions so take them as you will:

    1. Limit some of his activity such as jumping around that kind of activity is $#@! knees as it is but when he's as straight as he is I wouldn't risk it.
    2. Take some weight off - nor more than 3-5 pounds. That will help take some stress off his knees.
    3. If you are able to do a lot of swimming exercises to tone up his thigh muscles. They will help support his hips as they could possibly have issues later down the road.

    As I said these are merely suggestions. I have had too many friends whose dogs have suffered from HD and ACL tears and let me tell you they are expensive and a PITA to deal with.
    He does a lot of swimming in the summertime, but we shouldn't be doing any disc dog stuff then?

    What about pulling? We don't do weight pull, but we do rollerblade in the summer and sled in the winter (I want to switch over to skijoring because it's too much for him alone to pull me with the full basket).

    My vet x-rayed his hips years ago (he's 5 now) and she said he had pretty good hips. Although, he does have a very square hip with his femoral head on almost a perfect 90 degree angle into the acetebulum. I thought that was good but after looking at pictures of some dogs here, it looks like you want some angle in the pelvis.

    I will definitely try to get some weight off of him as well. It's difficult because he clearly has bad genetics (he's not beautifully toned like some of the dogs here) and he's so active that I hate to feed him less. He's starved after a few hours out running/working. I feel bad :( lol

    Sandi, unfortunately not. "Sexy" senorita walking is not the way I would describe it... More Mr.Burns, $#@! clenching.. lol. My niece and nephew call him a fairy when he trots, he picks his hind legs up high and kicks out a lot. Poor Hades!
    Last edited by K9 Love; 12-29-2010 at 11:09 PM.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    The Murder Mitten
    Posts
    6,828
    Vitamin C is a good joint supplement and an anti inflammatory. And diatomaceous earth is good for damn near everything as far as I can tell (I take it and the dogs get it in their food, personally my messed up joints and ligaments feel great after being on DE for a few months).

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by mstngchic2012 View Post
    These are suggestions so take them as you will:

    1. Limit some of his activity such as jumping around that kind of activity is $#@! knees as it is but when he's as straight as he is I wouldn't risk it.
    2. Take some weight off - nor more than 3-5 pounds. That will help take some stress off his knees.
    3. If you are able to do a lot of swimming exercises to tone up his thigh muscles. They will help support his hips as they could possibly have issues later down the road.

    As I said these are merely suggestions. I have had too many friends whose dogs have suffered from HD and ACL tears and let me tell you they are expensive and a PITA to deal with.

    I would like to add that Mater has bowed legs in the rear which cause him to walk different too. I try to limit the kind of exercise he gets so that an ACL tear will hopefully not occur. But I have a feeling that we will have HD issues down the road as he gets older.
    Great suggestions! I worry about Deeohgee, too. She had ACL surgery when she was adopted by that $#@!hat. She is SO hyper and drivey, I HAVE to excersise her but I just cringe non stop with every move she makes hoping she doesn't blow her other leg. :( I'm hoping in the summer, we can get her used to the swim tank. :)

    Deeohgee is bowed in her back legs as well. :rolleyes:

  16. #16
    This is just my opinion and some other may agree but I would limit any activity that has him jumping around and putting extra impact on his knees. And with his knees I would also say no to pulling as well.

    Do you have a basement or a garage? You could do some hillbilly rigging by getting a big water trough (like horses and cattle drink out of) and have him swim in that daily. It's great exercise without the added stress and impact.

    As far as a diet, you can feed a higher calorie diet so the he is getting what he needs with out feeding him quite as much. Also if you do limit his activity you will want to cut back on his food anyways because he won't be burning through as much.

  17. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by omgrobyn View Post
    Vitamin C is a good joint supplement and an anti inflammatory.
    Salmon oil is good for this as well. :)

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    The Murder Mitten
    Posts
    6,828
    Quote Originally Posted by Zoe View Post
    Salmon oil is good for this as well. :)
    I just load all of that up in the dogs food. They seem to like the citrusy flavor, it covers up the ACV a bit. Or they're dumb and just think the more preparation I put into their food the better it will be, when really it's the same old crap.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Ontario, Canada.. eh!
    Posts
    2,716
    I've thought about starting on DE when we switched to raw but I'm so effin' nervous about the whole "don't inhale it" scare tactic. It's scared the crap out of me. I didn't know that it helped for joints though, I thought people just used it for parasites.

    We have a basement but it's our weight room so there's no extra room for anything and because it's so damned cold here I'm sure it wouldn't work for my garage (it's not insulated). Bah!

    How would I exercise him aside from swimming then? For years he's; gone on hour or more off leash runs, rollerblading/sled (45 minutes or more), plays ball and frisbee (a few times a day 10-15 minute sessions) and is hand walked rarely. The most hand walking we do is to the field or woods where he gets let off to rip around. That's just the stuff we do for exercise, he also tracks which for him is similar to pull work I have to have a lot of tension on the line with him, does obedience (single jumps) and fun agility (so not full height jumps or equipment).

    Other than swimming (which he does do in the summertime) what can he do? I know if I just stop all of this and don't substitute anything in he'll go crazy!

  20. #20
    Red is just about as straight as Hades is in the rear. She has 2 torn ACLs and a partial of the other one in one leg. Keep WEIGHT down, muscle up and tons of swimming year rtound as well as supplements. Red is so straight in the rear that surgery is not an option for her ACL tears.

    ---------- Post added at 11:27 PM ---------- Previous post was at 11:26 PM ----------

    Ester-C

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. How is his conformation?
    By Lesa_b in forum General Dog Discussions
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 07-17-2012, 06:37 PM
  2. Pork neck and hock, safe for pup?
    By Mr.Biggs in forum Health & Nutritional Care
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 06-20-2011, 10:15 PM
  3. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 12-21-2010, 11:30 PM
  4. ham hock bones?
    By Trinasmom in forum Health & Nutritional Care
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 03-26-2010, 06:43 PM
  5. Defects :Kink tail? Easty/Westy, Cow Hock,etc...
    By Tru Texan in forum Health & Nutritional Care
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 10-30-2009, 02:12 PM

Visitors found this page by searching for:

double-jointed hocks in dogs

double jointed hocks in dogs

double jointed hock in dogs

bad hocks in dogs

Bad conformation in dogs

dog straight hocks

hyperextended hock dog

hyperextended hocks dogs

bad hock conformation

dog hock stifle

double-jointedness of hock dog

bad conformation in westies

dog with bad conformation photos

hyperextended hock caninedouble hock apbthock confirmation in dogsstraight hocks in dogsdogs souble jointed hockshyperextended hocksdog poor conformationpit bulls double jointedbad comformation in dodsdouble jointed hocks in puppiesbad hocks dogsevere conformation problems in dogdog double jointed hocksdouble jointed hocksdry hocks can they afect the stiflestaffie straight hockspitbull conformation problemsdog hock conformationdog straight hockpit bull conformationdouble jointed hock dogdog double jointed hock

Bookmarks