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  1. #1

    How Long Does Parvo Last? Shots?, Question/Story

    A friend of mine had a pit bull, 3 pit bulls to be exact that were blue nose puppies that died of parvo, that was 2 months ago and they were inside dogs.....He just got a new puppy that had his first shots already, but I don't know how long parvo stands for? He already got his first shots but, I don't want this dog to die....

  2. #2
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    Post Parvo is a very crude fate.

    Dogs can usually get parvo until about four or five months. I have seen many dogs die from it. Your best bet would be to keep the dog away from cats and anywhere cats may be, adult dogs aswell as these animals can carry the virus without being affected. If the dog has had his shots, you shouldn't have to worry too much. My pit was outside everyday at three months, with our cats, and he is fine. Just watch him closely and if anything seems wrong contact your vet right away.

  3. #3
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    I've always been told that once you have had a pup that had Parvo, it takes about 6 months for all traces of it to be gone. I think if your pup has the 3 shot series that pups get, it's good for a year, then they get a booster with their shots every year, at least that's what I think I remember the vet telling me. I know people say to clean your the crates and house extra good with a bleach solution to kill it from the crate your previous pup was in.

  4. i had a pup die from parvo and was suggested just to bleach outside and inside and wash very well all blankets or anything where the previous dog was at. like they said as well as long he has his shots hes good to go

  5. #5
    Cats don't carry or shed the parvo virus that affects dogs.

    The virus can live in the environment for years. Speculations go up to 5 - 7 years. Bleach solution is the way to go to disinfect previously contaminated areas... and keeping the new pup away from those contaminated areas wouldn't be a bad precaution either.

    The new pup won't be drawing off of it's own immune system until it has received its full vaccination series, which consists of vaccination against parvo every 3 weeks until the pup is older than 16 weeks of age. They can still be infected after that, if their immune response during the vaccine series wasn't adequate (stress/genetics/other sickness) or if the vaccine was not handled properly.

    Vaccinating more often than that, or injecting more vaccine or whatever voodoo is out there.. won't improve the immuneresponse.. in some cases, it will even make it worse.

  6. parvo has nothing whatsoever to do with cats and is not an airborn disease.once an outbreak has occured burn anything wooden that the pup/dog came into contact with.
    parvo can effect the heart which is survivable or go straight to the brain which is likely to lead to death.either way if a pup survives the disease it is very likely to carry effects of the disease for life often from as little as a sensitive stomach to more serious complications.best thing to do is be uscrupulously hygienic and get your dogs/pups jabbed
    if in doubt if your property has remains of the parvo virus have a soil sample done it is not cheaper but can be cheaper than dead pups !
    Last edited by mr.clueless; 07-08-2009 at 03:23 PM.

  7. #7
    $#@!, I will inform you if anything goes bad....

  8. Quote Originally Posted by BrokenBread View Post
    $#@!, I will inform you if anything goes bad....
    $#@! is right, You should have done this checking beforehand, then again, you did own 3 "bluenose" pups that all died of the same thing, not really a glowing history there.

  9. #9
    Not me.....

  10. #10
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    I've never heard that cats carry the disease either. Also, the thing with symptoms are that by the time you "notice" something wrong with your pup, that he's sick, and get him to the vet, in some cases, it's too late to save the dog. Make sure your pup has his shots done as soon as you get them home and then make sure your next two follow up visits are right when the vet tells you to bring them back in, don't postpone an appointment, the pups need those shots spaced precisely for their own health. Good luck with your pup, I hope you have nothing but years of happiness with him.

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by PunishTheDeed,NotTheBreed View Post
    Dogs can usually get parvo until about four or five months. I have seen many dogs die from it. Your best bet would be to keep the dog away from cats and anywhere cats may be, adult dogs aswell as these animals can carry the virus without being affected. If the dog has had his shots, you shouldn't have to worry too much. My pit was outside everyday at three months, with our cats, and he is fine. Just watch him closely and if anything seems wrong contact your vet right away.

    Uh, the canine parvovirus is only contagious to canines (aka dogs). Cats, people, horses,toads, etc. cannot get become infected with it.

    Parvo can be transferred, however, on the soles of your shoes should you step in fecal matter expelled from a dog with the disease and then walk directly into your own yard.

    And unvaccinated dogs can contract the disease at any age whether it be 3 months, 3 years or 13 years of age.

    As for the virus, some studies suggest it can live in the environment (aka your yard, the ground outside the vet clinic, etc.) for up to a year and other studies suggest a longer lifetime of 2 years.

    As for dog's that contract the virus and manage to survive, they still shed the virus in their stools for at least 2 weeks after they are considered "cured".

    To the OP, if your friend didn't bleach his entire yard and the inside of his home and either throw away or wash (in bleach) in and all bedding that the pups came into contact with, then he definitely still has the virus on his property. I suggest he get a sprayer and mix up a bleach/water solution and get to spraying. And I suggest he get some spray cleaner for the inside his home and get to cleaning. If he's already got another pup there, that pup has now already been exposed. And a single vaccine is not enough to prevent the pup from coming down with Parvo.
    Last edited by Miakoda; 07-10-2009 at 11:08 AM. Reason: spelling

  12. #12

    Cats and canine parvovirus

    Just a point of clarification here: When canine parvovirus type 2b first started ravaging the country (back in the late 70s, early 80s...most of y'all are probably too young to remember), the prevailing theory at the time as that the virus was a mutation of the feline panleukopenia virus (which is a type of parvovirus itself).

    Veterinarians at that time were even using feline panleukopenia vaccines in attempts to protect dogs until a canine parvovirus vaccine was created.

    BUT...as Mia said, canine parvovirus affects canines and not cats or people. Since it is transmitted fecally to orally, it is important to clean up any organic fecal material prior to cleaning with the bleach. Any remaining organic material will deactivate the bleach and lessen its effectiveness against the virus. A 30:1 dilution of water to bleach is usually sufficient.

    Canine parvovirus affects the intestinal lining making absorption of nutrients difficult and causes diarrhea that dehydrates the pup. Furthermore, the virus also attacks the precursor cells in the bone marrow for white blood cells (like neutrophils). With a decrease in these white blood cells, bacteria (getting into the bloodstream from the degraded intestinal lining) can travel throughout the body unhindered and cause severe infection (sepsis) making the pup feel poorly and many will start vomiting. This, of course, leads to more dehydration. Without proper care, pups die of dehydration and sepsis. And, yes, in some cases, the virus has attacked cardiac tissue.

    Follow the advice given here, make sure the pup is vaccinated at regular intervals per your veterinarian's directions and monitor him for any signs of illness. Often the first sign of parvo is a puppy that goes off food because he doesn't feel well.

  13. No puppies should be in the house until 16 weeks and have had all their shots.
    Parvo can stay for about a year. Using bleach will kill it, the problem is absolutely everything much be bleached that they were on or had contact with. Fecal matter can be tracked in and brought into the house and you can have a huge mess that you can't see. I would tell you the puppy has already been exposed to the enviroment it is a little late now. I am not a vet nor do I claim to be. So call your vet and ask them about immune boosters. There are a few good herbal remedies you can use. Parvaid is one that can boost the immune system. Even though he/she has not aquired the disease. Parvaid can be used on very healthy animals. The herbs in it are designed to boost immune system.
    You can use perventive measures. Check stools often a little extra vitamin c in food,
    and some pau'd arco tea. They are herbs and can be used as suppliments to boost the immune system. They can not hurt. Even if you remove the puppy at this time it is to late. We make people wear booties in to my kennel because Parvo can be tracked in on your feet from outside. You can walk through it and not know it.
    All puppies should be kept in a protected home and go to a safe place in the yard to go potty. Same place everytime until the 12th week shot. 6,9,12 We also
    give a shot at 16 weeks just because our area is a high parvo area. I wish you good luck if the puppy comes down with Parvo. Call your vet, You can also call me I have taken care of sick babies.

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