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  1. #1
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    2 Puppies? Double Trouble

    Double Trouble: raising more than one puppy.
    Bonding
    The real problem is not the constant chaos involved with trying to keep up with two perpetual motion machines, but the realization that since the dogs have each other, they really don't need you! They're much more interested in roughhousing and running together than the ball games and long walks that you planned on enjoying with them.
    Training is a nightmare. When you and your spouse try to separate the twosome for their daily lessons, they cry and bark and carry on trying to get back together. Even standing on your head, you can't get their attention for a moment. What can you do to get things back on track and have these pups grow into the wonderful companions you wanted?
    The underlying problem is bonding. Since the pups were left alone together while you were away and never separated when you were around, their primary bond is with each other and not with you and the other family members! Never having been separated, they haven't had the opportunity to develop a closer bond with humans.
    Here are some tips for managing two pups that will maximize their chances at becoming great companions.
    First, the pups should sleep separately. Approximately two weeks after they come home with you, they should be trained to sleep in separate crates.
    Separation
    But don't combine the stress of a new home with the stress of being separated right off. Start out by placing their crates side-by-side. Gradually move the crates apart so that eventually they are comfortable sleeping in different rooms. (This also prevents the development of separation anxiety problems in the future should they suddenly have to be separated due to an accident or illness.)
    Once they are able to sleep in separate rooms, start separating them for short periods during the day. Start while you're at home, perhaps with naps in their crates. Build up the time so that they're calm and comfortable when apart for several hours. (Ideally, they should be confined in separate areas in exercise pens during your long absences. Although this may not be possible, it's a good way to prevent the dogs from becoming overly dependent on each other's presence.) They can share water bowls but try feeding them separately.
    From the very start take them outside separately as well as together for short excursions around the neighborhood, car rides, and socialization visits.
    Training Tips
    Enroll them in puppy cl$#@!, but keep them apart as much as possible during the cl$#@!. At first do the puppy cl$#@! homework while separated. Then, once they know the lessons, bring them together and practice. Teach them to pay attention to you, even though they're around each other. As a reward for working with you willingly, allow them to romp briefly together between lessons.
    The pups will learn their names faster if you use their names each time you interact with them. In the beginning, names should always be said in a happy tone of voice in a rewarding context such as when praising, giving meals or teaching a command that will be rewarded with praise, petting, and a treat. Once they're a bit older, and respond to their names, you can use a name before reprimanding of one of the pups without involving the other.
    Be the Leader
    Exercise good leadership. Don't let one pup become excessively dominant. Allow them to establish their relationship, but intervene if one puppy becomes overly domineering. Give each puppy equal time and attention, and try not to favor one over the other.
    To make sure each puppy responds equally to all family members, everyone who's able should participate in the training and care taking of both pups.
    As you can see, raising two puppies together to their maximum potential is considerably more work than just bringing up one. But it's still a small price to pay for two super puppies!
    Peter J. Vollmer 1997-2008
    Nancy B. Vollmer 1997-2008
    SuperPuppy(R) 1997-2008

  2. #2
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    I do not recommend raising two pups for the average owner especially an unexperienced one. I see too many getting two thinking it will be easy and they will just entertain each other. Some people don't realize the amount of time that needs to go into raising one pup, let alone two.

    Double the fun, but remember also double the vet bills training, time, food bill, toy bill. However if you have the time to do it properly it is also double the love :)

    Also wanted to add, remember just because pups are raised together or are siblings, it doesn't mean they will grow up and always get along.

  3. #3
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    I agree POP thanks for adding

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Drgnrdr View Post
    I agree POP thanks for adding
    I'm glad you posted it. So many seem to ask about this topic.

  5. #5

    Double Trouble

    Very interesting...I wish I had found his forum BEFORE I got the pups. They are nothing like I thought they would be. It really has been "double trouble". But all in all they have been a comfort, just don't learn as I would like them too. They seem to have a mind of their own!!

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Patch O' Pits View Post
    I do not recommend raising two pups for the average owner especially an unexperienced one. I see too many getting two thinking it will be easy and they will just entertain each other. Some people don't realize the amount of time that needs to go into raising one pup, let alone two.

    Double the fun, but remember also double the vet bills training, time, food bill, toy bill. However if you have the time to do it properly it is also double the love :)

    Also wanted to add, remember just because pups are raised together or are siblings, it doesn't mean they will grow up and always get along.
    i agree with you.

  7. #7
    o man o man i wish i knew this before.i got Tia and 4 mth later nitro and it has been a up hill battel with nitro who is so att to Tia.

  8. #8
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    good advice

  9. my dog biggie gets along great with other dogs but for some odd reason hates his sister armani they are always getting way to aggressive when they are around eachother but with any other dog hes fine i dont understand...

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2007
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    do the other strange dogs he's exposed to come to your home or meet on street?
    is she in your home or you their's? when this arguments happen?
    competition of resource
    Last edited by Drgnrdr; 09-10-2009 at 02:16 PM. Reason: spell

  11. My Pits are four years apart.I am glad they get along when I am around..HOWEVER,when I am out the female goes in her crate.Never trust a Pitbull not to fight..

  12. #12
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    2 unseparable puppies

    I actually need some advice. I have two sisters, they are about 11 months now. They are awesome and terrible at the same time, it is so hard to train and walk them sometimes. We really need to change how we do things, i know, we are moving and as of now we have had them in the same large cage (i see now that wasnt such a good idea) but now we need to separate them more so we can train them successfully. How do I start going about this? This post was helpful in general- but if someone can direct me to a more detailed post that would be great. I know whining and crying is going to be inevitable...I just want well trained puppies..and we are willing to put in the time and effort because I would never get rid of them...but any starter tips would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!

  13. We had 4 puppies at once. 2 8wks old, 1 13 wks old, and 1 5 month old. It was hard to house break them, but basic obedience was easy. Not something I would do again simply because of the house breaking.

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Patch O' Pits View Post
    I do not recommend raising two pups for the average owner especially an unexperienced one. I see too many getting two thinking it will be easy and they will just entertain each other. Some people don't realize the amount of time that needs to go into raising one pup, let alone two.

    Double the fun, but remember also double the vet bills training, time, food bill, toy bill. However if you have the time to do it properly it is also double the love :)

    Also wanted to add, remember just because pups are raised together or are siblings, it doesn't mean they will grow up and always get along.
    I think I would have to disagree that having two pups at once is a bad idea. Dogs are dogs, and they like to be in packs. I have two puppies (13 and 15 weeks) old. I got the boy first, and then I brought home a female one week later. As soon as I brought in the female, they started playing right away and LOVED each other. They always cuddle together every night. I take them for walks every single day, but I still think it is good for them to be able to play and chase each other around the yard during the day. As far as the training, I taught each one how to sit and lay down separately. I taught them how to "sit and stay" at the same time with treats. If one didn't stay, then I would just keep rewarding the other with treats until she finally caught on. I can now have them "sit and stay" on the other side of the house until I say, "all done." Two pups around the same age (male and female) is good for them in my opinion. My boy is about 30lbs at 13 weeks, and she is about 20lbs at 15 weeks old. He is stronger and can wrestle her down, but she is quicker and likes to play chase with him. It is a good combination in my opinion if you have the time. I work from home, so I am with them all day. I think that helps. However, if I worked away from home, I don't know how good that would be for a SOLO puppy. I take them out in public all the time and they are well behaved.

  15. #15
    Here is pic from last week.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

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    Last edited by sduran165; 07-09-2010 at 01:44 PM.

  16. #16
    Your dogs are puppies. Most "pit bull" breeds aren't keen on other dogs by the time they reach maturity, even those they have grown up with. Dog aggression is a very real possibility in the future. I hope you hang around and read some of the NUMEROUS accounts of DA rearing it's head, and the owners who never expected it.

  17. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by galadriel View Post
    your dogs are puppies. Most "pit bull" breeds aren't keen on other dogs by the time they reach maturity, even those they have grown up with. Dog aggression is a very real possibility in the future. I hope you hang around and read some of the numerous accounts of da rearing it's head, and the owners who never expected it.
    da??

  18. #18
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    Dog Aggression. A highly common trait in pit bulls.

  19. #19
    multiple dog households are hard enough... i have four. expect there to be fights. expect vet bills and lots of cleaning. it's a lot of work. DA is a pain, but normal for the breed. invest in a breakstick. just b/c they are puppies doesn't mean they will get along as they get older. i've learned this the hard way.

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